‘New Community Gathering’ unites Episcopal ethnic ministries

first_img Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Suffragan Diane Bruce of Los Angeles is blessed during a Native American ceremony at the New Community conference. Photo/Keith Yamamoto[Episcopal News Service] Stories of faith and personal witness animated the historic Feb. 29 – March 3 “New Community Gathering” in San Diego of about 300 Asian, Black, Latino and Native American clergy and laity from across the Episcopal Church.Community engagement, mission focus and collaboration ranked high on the agenda for the event, themed “Reclaiming our Mission; Reinterpreting Our Contexts and Renewing Our Communities.”Organized through the Ethnic Ministries offices of the Episcopal Church, the gathering challenged enthusiastic participants – as well as the wider church – to embrace renewal through creative mission, sharing resources and honoring ethnic and community context.“There was a sense the timing was right for this historic gathering,” said the Rev. Winfred Vergara, missioner for Episcopal Asiamerica Ministries (EAM). “It is simply a time of sharing joys and hopes and rethinking possibilities.”“We need to find resonance in each other’s experiences because we have experienced feeling unwelcome, and because we have the capacity to welcome and embrace,” he said. “The Spirit is here, expressing that we can reach out to one another because of common experiences of pain and common vision of hope.”All were welcome to attend the gathering although the focus was multiculturalism. The idea for the event grew out of General Convention multi-ethnic festivals and vocational discernment conferences for young adults of color, but was the first leadership development event of its kind, Vergara added.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori greeted participants March 1 via Skype from Taiwan while President of the House of Deputies Bonnie Anderson addressed the gathering during a March 3 plenary session on lay vocation and discernment. Bishop Stacy Sauls, Episcopal Church chief operating officer, presided over a commissioning service and presenters included the Very Rev. Michael Battle of the Raleigh, North Carolina-based PeaceBattle Institute, Inc. and Dr. Rodger Nishioka, associate professor of Christian education at Columbia Theological Seminary in Decatur, Georgia.The Rev. Angela Ifill, Episcopal Church missioner for Black ministries, said she hoped participants would continue to use insights gained and to seize future opportunities “to come together to understand one another from our various communities and to appreciate the perspective of each other … and a sense that this is good and we need to keep doing it.”Reclaiming mission: a Richmond storyThe Rev. Lynne Washington, vicar of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, in Richmond, Virginia, described how the congregation worked to reclaim its mission amid a changing context.Initially St. Peter’s, founded in 1858, seemed a mismatch for its adjacent community, where 40 percent of the residents live in public housing and do not graduate high school. Most of the congregation’s parishioners were college graduates and commuters, she said.After extensive discipleship training, congregational and community surveys, and re-visioning the church’s mission, Washington redesigned the Sunday liturgy to fit community needs.“If you have a community where 40 percent of the people have not completed high school, the prayer book is a stumbling block,” she said. “The 1982 Hymnal is a stumbling block. So I hired a Baptist musician and she has been wonderful because it’s music the community can relate to.”The service booklet is used as a teaching tool and she adapted the popular U2charist to “a trial mass called the ‘Earth, Wind and Fire Mass.’ My first thought when I saw U2charist was, that’s nice, but it’s not going to fly here,” Washington said.“We have an average attendance on Sunday of 45. But at the Earth, Wind and Fire Mass we had over 125. Maybe for now we’ve caught on to something. Maybe it’s an evangelism tool. I just know that Sunday, it worked.”The church invested in a web page and advertising in local African American community newspapers, re-energized community outreach and intentionally focused ministries on both youth and senior citizens, she said. Still, limited resources make hiring a youth leader or Christian education director unlikely; she hopes to share resources with other congregations “and not necessarily Episcopal churches,” she told the gathering.“I’ve asked for missionaries to come into the inner city and learn from us,” added Washington, who until recently also served as the executive director of the St. Peter and Paul Community Center. Founded by the church, the center relocated from the parish hall to a recently constructed building across the street several years ago. “I know it’s possible because many of these same individuals are at the community center volunteering to tutor children.”The good news is, the congregation is open to change, she added. “When we began this process it became a mantra for us — to grow we have to be willing to change. We’re also very clear that we’re not looking for the diocese to rescue us, and that’s important as a congregation.“We have our own sense of independence because for many, many years we had this paternalistic DNA that somebody else was going to help us or somebody else was going to fix us. That took a lot of our own power away from us, and we’ve gained it back.”Bishop Jim Mathes of San Diego, who welcomed the group, said the diocese is also in the process of relocating its headquarters to the Ocean Beach area, where it currently provides 3,000 service contacts monthly in the form of 12-step groups, meals, legal and medical assistance, even haircuts.“We’ve established mission and ministry there. Now we’re going to gather those who are being served and find their congregation,” he said.Contextually, the diocese identified its mission focus as advocacy and action in the areas of immigration and border issues, poverty and homelessness and veteran’s assistance.Moving into the community in a new way is exciting, he said. “I’m going to be changed by this location … leadership will be changed in this missional approach. The whole community will be changed.”Evangelism and community renewalHearing the personal faith stories of others is among the most powerful evangelistic witness available, yet often Episcopalians don’t even consider it an option, said the Rev. Anthony Guillén, Episcopal Church missioner for Latino/Hispanic ministries.“We don’t realize what great sales people we are,” he said. From computers to movies to restaurants, people are always talking about their favorite choices, offering a kind of sales pitch without even realizing it, he said.“We sell every day, telling people where they ought to go to get everything except what we proclaim as the good news,” added Guillen, who hopes the San Diego gathering will exemplify “an image of what the church will be.”“If I have a great meal, I tell people about it and where I got it. We have to start telling them where to go to satisfy the hunger we have in our souls.”An encounter with a kind chaplain in an Anglican school in Hong Kong was so powerful that 30 of the 33 Buddhist students asked to be baptized at graduation, recalled Mimi Wu, Province VIII Asian Ministries network coordinator.She was one of those students. “I say evangelism is love in action and I’ve seen it,” said Wu, of the Diocese of Hawai’i. “The chaplain shepherded us, he gave us so much love and understanding.”Evangelism, for the Rev. Canon Rene Barraza, came in the form of persistent invitations from friends, who kept inviting him to St. Athanasius Church in Los Angeles, where he now serves as canon pastor.“When I first arrived from Mexico, I felt out of place there. I didn’t like it (St. Athanasius) at all,” recalled Barraza, 69. “It was wooden and small and dark. I was used to big Roman cathedral churches with stained glass windows. It scared me. I decided not to go back. But my friends kept inviting me.“Now, I’m glad I went back with an open mind. They invited me to read and then to acolyte and one thing led to another and I’ve been growing in my faith ever since.”The Rev. Joseph Jerome said evangelism has meant intentionally reaching out to others in the Sunnyside community in the Diocese of Long Island, where he is rector of All Saints Church, a mostly Anglo congregation.For them it has meant intentionally being welcoming and disregarding a popular saying that “there’s two sides to Sunnyside, my side and the other side,” added Jerome, who is Black and serves as president of the diocesan Hispanic Commission.Evangelism for the Rev. Edgar Gutierrez, came in the form of a warm welcome he received. “I am a gay man who left the Catholic Church because of its stand on women, and gays and lesbians,” he said.The rector of St. Luke’s Church, a bilingual, multi-ethnic congregation in Boston, said he has “felt a calling to the priesthood since I was a child.”The gathering offered a chance to “recharge” as well as “a sense of family, the way a family nurtures us, and a source of information and inspiration.”Honoring multiculturalism; the importance of interconnectionMarcel Pereira, 31, attended the gathering from Brazil’s Diocese of Curitiba and discovered that “the issues you’re facing in the United States are very similar to what we’re seeing in Brazil.“The multicultural world we are living in and how to embrace diversity without becoming something else are just some of the issues,” he said.“The solutions we are finding about the New Community is an answer for all other parts of the church,” he added. “They are the same 21st century issues, welcoming everybody in a radical way, changing language and culture. Plus technology. We used to be book-oriented; now we’re image-oriented and we have to understand how to embrace this culture.”For the Rev. Brandon Mauai, 27, the interconnection of sharing stories and resources drew him to the San Diego conference.“We all have different stories of where we came from that show our diversity. I have an Asian, Native American and Polynesian background,” said Mauai, who serves as youth minister on the Standing Rock Native American Reservation in South Dakota. “My experience is the Filipino experience in Hawai’i and it helps to share our stories with each other and the Episcopal Church,” he said.“It helps nurture faith and hope and love as we live it everyday and helps us show it to others, to have a ripple effect” especially with youth of the reservation who desperately need to feel that hope.”Bishop Dave Bailey said the conference represents another step along the journey through “self awareness to self-determination” for his diocese of Navajoland as well as other struggling communities.“It’s important for us in this gathering to come together as the New Community in support of one another in new and life-giving ways, recognizing that we don’t have to be in competition but to confirm our commonality and appreciate our uniqueness,” he said.“I believe this is a new beginning for the life of the church and in many ways can be life-giving to many of our dioceses that can be stagnant.”Bishop Suffragan Diane Bruce of Los Angeles called the gathering “the new face of the church.” She came “to learn and to support the conference. This is just the beginning,” she said. “I look forward to more of these conferences and coming together with more people and their bishops.”It was a follow-up meeting for Bernadette Wyche of the African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas in Philadelphia and Trevor Bryan II of St. Luke’s, New Orleans, whose two congregations are partnering through the Office of Black Ministries New Visions Initiative.The program pairs thriving African American congregations with smaller churches. Bryan said the San Diego gathering “offered a lot.“Whenever we get a chance to couple with indigenous, Asian and Latino/Hispanic communities we discover we have very similar experiences. We’re at different stages of those experiences but there is a lot we can learn from these exchanges of culture.”Episcopal Church Native American Missioner Sarah Eagle Heart said the gathering afforded missioners an opportunity to tell their own stories because “sometimes people don’t really understand what the ethnic missioners do.“Our job runs the gamut from Christian formation to advocacy to theological training,” she said. Missioners have developed videos, she explained, so the wider church will get a sense of the range of their responsibilities and of the importance of ethnic ministry.She hopes the church will “help bring back culture and language because they were part of the church that took it away … and hopefully will help to give it back.”She described workshops at the event about the asset-based community development and healing programs she oversees, which are “a powerful approach to develop a wider circle of people to invest in … and to realize ambitions by discovering and mobilizing their resources already present in that community.”Indigenous Christians have much to offer, said Eagle Heart, who is Oglala Lakota. “Our people have a multitude of gifts and cultural knowledge to share with one another as they walk their spiritual journey … to have a family of supporters who share common challenges and can encourage one other as they continue the ordination process or lay training is a unique blessing.“I am proud of my team of ethnic missioners who were prophetic in laying the foundation of this conference on lifelong Christian formation to ensure this event was a transformative moment of renewal. The sage and water blessing by elder Deacon Reynelda James (Paiute) with indigenous women was a sacred time of healing for the circle of relatives gathered.”Other workshops presented included: mission and advocacy; evangelism; Jubilee and social justice; School to Prison Pipeline; the Doctrine of Discovery; ministry of the baptized; environmental formation; technology in ministry; and stewardship.Longkee Vang, 24, of the Church of the Holy Apostles, in St. Paul, Minnesota, which has the Episcopal Church’s largest Hmong population, said he felt compelled to attend the gathering because “I want change.“I came to show that I’m willing to help make change, to be among people who feel the same way I do, to be among the mover and shakers and people who make a difference in the church.“I want to see that real change does come, what we have dreamt about. This is an opportunity to connect with others who want change too.”— The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA By Pat McCaughanPosted Mar 6, 2012 Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ethnic Ministries Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA John D. Andrews says: Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Comments are closed.center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Sharon Ely Pearson says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 March 7, 2012 at 11:56 am And it is interesting that the Office of Formation & Vocations (whose budgets were decimated in the new proposed budget) worked closely with the Ethnic Ministries Office in planning this conference. This is a wonderful example of how funds on the church-wide level are used to help the grassroots local level that would otherwise not be able to gather, connect and network. My guess is this type of thing will not be able to happen in the future if the 2013-2015 budget remains as it stands now. Sharon Ely PearsonMember, Standing Commission on Lifelong Christian Formation and Education Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments (2) Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Submit an Event Listing March 6, 2012 at 11:17 pm I attended this conference not knowing what the vision of the conference was. I’m still not sure. Sitting in the conference this vision came to mind. The United States is becoming increasingly diverse, ethnically and culturally. There has been much discussion about the need for the Episcopal Church to change. The vision that came to me was of this conference being the leaven that will cause the Episcopal Church to change by being more responsive to the needs of all people, no matter their ethnicity or their culture. Jesus loved and served all people, not just the Jews. We must love and serve all people. Also, as we welcome people into our churches, it must not be with the intention of making them like us, but being opened to them changing us. ‘New Community Gathering’ unites Episcopal ethnic ministries AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more

Why I am hopeful about the Trayvon Martin case

first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH By Stacy SaulsPosted Mar 28, 2012 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bud Sherwood says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Kyle Green says: March 29, 2012 at 11:52 pm Thank you, Bishop Sauls. At least you did write about an issue that mothers, fathers and sons have faced before. Thank you! March 29, 2012 at 8:43 am That is the point he is making. It *seemed* clear to him at first but then he says: When I get less angry, I look at it a little differently. One thing I have learned repeatedly in my life is to be suspicious of what appears to be clear particularly when there are other rational sources who are seeing it as not so clear at all.So as you can see if you read his entire essay, the facts are not clear to him at all, which is why he is glad the case is being properly investigated. March 29, 2012 at 12:08 am Our COO says nothing at all about the effect of the iniquitous “Stand Your Ground” Law.. If GZ eventually goes free, it is because of the confrontation that apparently took place. It is reported that GZ followed TM by car, and got out of the car. A physical fight took place, in the course of which GZ received some minor injury, which he parlayed into his claim of “self defense”.This story has more chapters to be heard, including confirmation (if possible) of my own understanding.I agree that we need to be patient, although I find it easy to understand why an 815 administrative leader felt compelled to express the dismay felt by so many of us.I hope that in due course, after her return from abroad and more facts are known, our Chief Pastor may have some reflection for us. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Nigel A. Renton says: Rector Albany, NY Rev. Irene Radcliff says: Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest March 28, 2012 at 9:45 pm I have a horrid suspicion that the fact that all the facts are not known is because the authorities are moving in awful dread of the NRA. Is not George Zimmerman a poster boy for that meretricious organization? After all, he was licensed to carry a loaded firearm. He was licensed to use it in “self-defense.” He has not been arrested. How does one explain the inaction of the authorities to arrest [Zimmerman] and throw him in jail while the matter is investigated. All we have is a dead body and his side of the story. Thank you, Bishop Sauls, for explicating this tragedy. When did the constitutional right to “keep and bear arms” trump the right to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness”? Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI March 29, 2012 at 7:31 am Mr. Ryan,You speak as though you have personal insight as to how young Trayvon Martin was reared. Furthermore, you mentioned his two-week suspension from school as if that has one iota to do with the reason he is no longer among us. You mentioned, or should I say, you alluded that Mr. Martin was wandering around in a strange gated community when, based on what is known to be fact, he had every right to be there. He was not wandering around, Mr. Ryan; he was making his way back to the residence at which he was a guest.And, if he, Mr. Martin, was trying to “beat someone’s brains out by smashing his head in to the concrete”, shouldn’t that “poor” soul be in the very least showing some signs of medical treatment, such images clearly not evident in the newly released video footage of the “injured” shooter at the Sanford Police Department? God does heal all wounds, after all.Let’s see what else this “Al Sharpton hate crimes hoax” unravels.I am grateful for Bishop Sauls’s reflections. They are helping to reconcile my raw emotions. Ernest E Thompson says: March 29, 2012 at 10:04 pm Sen. Jim Webb has a national crimes bill to overhaul the prison and sentencing system. He’s been unable to get it passed by the Senate since 2009; most recently failing by just 3 votes. He needs our public support. jack ryan says: March 28, 2012 at 8:18 pm Thank you Bishop. As the facts are more fully known (and all the facts will never be known) we will continue to be confronted with this terrible tragedy no matter what. Had a different kind of response from the authorities occurred more quickly perhaps some of the pain of this event would have been lessened. Your thoughtful comments are much appreciated. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem David Crean says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC Comments (11) March 29, 2012 at 4:19 am Thank you Bishop Sauls for your words of hope and reminder of God’s promise the to his people and the world. My prayer is that this tragic killing will give us renewed courage for the church to reclaim it’s rightful position as the moral voice in society and use its resources to dismantle the Industrial Prison System in America.“LET MY PEOPLE GO”John E. Harris Jr.President, Union of Black Episcopalians Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Maurice King says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group March 28, 2012 at 8:45 am Do you think it might be a good idea to wait until ALL the facts are known. If things were as CLEAR to the police as they are to you, an arrest would have been made. Why I am hopeful about the Trayvon Martin case Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Gloria Payne-Carter says: Ernie Bennett says: Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA March 29, 2012 at 5:42 am I live in Hyde Park Chicago – Obama’s old neighborhood. My family used to attend an Episcopal church in this neighborhood. The surrounding neighborhoods are close to 100% Black African American, we have severe problems with Black teenagers getting shot, shooting each other. We don’t have any local problems with evil White RACISTS unfairly targeting Black teens in hoodies and shooting them dead – no no problems with that at all.The Trayvon Martin case is shaping up to be just another Al Sharpton hate crime hoax. Martin might have been a cute, lovable lad when the photo used in this hate crime propaganda blitz was taken, but he was a troublesome 17 year old when he got into the trouble that resulted in his death. Much of the blame falls on his parents who didn’t do the simple things parents must do when their teens get in trouble. If your 17 year old son is suspended from school for 2 weeks, you have to work hard to see that he is disciplined, that you know where he is at night and during the day and that you don’t let him go wandering around in strange gated communities dressed up in a hoodie and drawing attention to yourself as criminal, trouble maker and then see that your son doesn’t try to beat someone’s brains out by smashing his head in to the concrete.OK, this is basic stuff – parenting 101, things the Episcopal church and other churches in our country used to do. We need to do these simple things again to save your teenage boys. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY [Huffington Post] This article first appeared on the Huffington Post here.In some ways I worry that I have no right to speak on the events of the last week in the United States, and especially in Florida, where I happen to be at the moment. I am, after all, a white person, and the victim of this unspeakable event is African American. I am also a white person who is the father of two sons who are not. I am a white Southerner who grew up in a world where segregation was the law and learned over time while I was growing up that the way things were did not in fact speak to the way things had to be because, as a matter of faith, they did not speak to the way God wanted things to be. I am a white Southerner who learned over the course of growing up that morality was a term that went beyond sex and had something to do with justice and peace. Even then, I’m not sure I have a right to speak about this event. But I am also a pastor, a minister of the Gospel. And I am a bishop who has taken a vow to “defend those who have no helper” (BCP, p. 518). I have no right to speak, and yet I must speak.It seems to me there are four things that need to be said about the death of Trayvon Martin.The first is that, regardless of anything else, a precious child of God has been lost. Sadly, this is not a rare phenomenon. Precious children of God are lost to violence in our country every day. It is often related to drugs and human greed. It very frequently has to do with being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Most receive nothing like the attention of Trayvon’s death. Yet, they all deserve to. It is truly an American tragedy. And Trayvon’s death ought to grieve our hearts at the deepest level. They all should. Perhaps Trayvon’s death will also help us remember about all the children who die senselessly in our country.The second is that one thing Trayvon’s death has brought to our attention in a forceful way is that every time an African American teenager, and indeed any minority teenager, walks out of the house, they are not as safe as a white teenager. And part of the horrible reason why has to do with prejudice, stereotypes and bigotry by people in power. This ought to be a call to action to us. It is imperative that we find a way to make this different. I do not have the prescription for correcting this blight on America, but I am convinced that America is, in fact, filled with people of good will of all racial backgrounds who can in fact find a way. It is urgent that we pledge ourselves to be part of that effort.The third is that one of the potential tragedies of this event grows from the fact that Trayvon Martin was an African American and George Zimmerman was Latino. One of the so far (I think thankfully) unspoken themes of this event might have to do with pitting one minority group against another. Nothing would better benefit oppression than placing one group of oppressed people against another. We do not have time for that. We only have time to be united for justice. Otherwise, I guarantee, injustice will win in our day, even if not ultimately.The fourth relates to the specifics of this case, a danger and a note of hope. This is the hardest thing for me to say, and the one I feel most unqualified to say. I fear I say it because I cannot help but look at this horrible reality through white eyes.What has come out so far seems to paint a relatively clear picture of what happened. That makes it very difficult to see why action has not already been taken to arrest the shooter. We cannot help but wonder if the shooter had been black, and the victim, white, would an arrest not have already been made? At least I cannot help but wonder that. And when I think about it, I find myself getting angrier.When I get less angry, I look at it a little differently. One thing I have learned repeatedly in my life is to be suspicious of what appears to be clear particularly when there are other rational sources who are seeing it as not so clear at all. When I get less angry, I look at some other facts. One is that this killing is not only in the hands of the local police or even the State of Florida. It is also in the hands of the U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. That assures me there are authorities involved beyond local politics and local prejudices. In the days of the Civil Rights Movement in my native South, it was the involvement of federal authorities that was the guarantor of justice. I am hopeful that will again be true.I am also heartened that state and local authorities are taking some important steps in the right direction. One was the voluntary stepping aside of the police chief. His leadership was compromised, and he got out of the way. That is good. Another is that a special prosecutor has been appointed. Another good sign and appropriate step.All those things confront me with an uncomfortable reality. Local authorities seem to be acting in appropriate ways procedurally. The federal government, particularly the FBI, are involved and overseeing everything, which makes me more optimistic that justice will be done. In light of the fact that those things are true and still no arrest has been made, might it be that there are some facts about this case that I do not know? Might it be that things are not so clear after all, at least to those who know more than I do? Could it be that people of good will committed to justice, particularly those without a local connection, know things not yet shared with the public that makes an arrest, at least at this point, unwise or even unjustified? We simply do not know. The question before us, though, is whether we are going to trust the system. It is admittedly difficult, but I find myself reluctant to despair of it yet. Thinking that complex things are clear leads to tragedy. In fact, that likely has a lot to do with what led to the tragic death of Trayvon in the first place. We must not succumb to it.There are two notes of danger here in something of a tension. One is that we will be complacent in holding the authorities to account. But another is that we will be cynically suspicious. Neither is good. I think one of the challenges for us spiritually is to be appropriately trusting and appropriately suspicious at the same time. That, I think, is most likely to lead to the truth. It is, though, a hard balance to maintain, especially when our emotions are otherwise.And I’ll tell you why, and this is a major difference from my growing up years in the segregated South. That has to do with my confidence in President Obama. The President spoke these crucially important words, the significance of which cannot be overlooked: “If I had a son, he’d look like Trayvon.” Those are words that were inconceivable until quite recently, that the son of the President of the United States might look like Trayvon Martin. And they are words that change everything. What made the system so suspect to me is whether it was possible for those at the highest level of power in our country to see their own face in the face of Trayvon. At the very least, the person of at the very top now can.That gives me something that is even more important spiritually than being confident that justice will be done. It gives me hope, hope that justice will be done, even when I cannot see clearly from my vantage point what justice looks like right now.President Obama said one other thing that makes me hopeful. He has promised that we will get to the bottom of what happened. The fact that he can see his face in Trayvon’s may be just the guarantee we need that we have not had before. For now, at least, I am inclined to trust the President and support him with prayer, as well as the people of Florida and, most especially, the family of Trayvon. For now, I think, I am inclined to wait. And I also think I have every reason to wait in hope.God, I know, has promised that justice will roll down like mighty waters. I am hopeful. And I believe I have reason to be hopeful.Bishop Stacy Sauls is the Chief Operating Officer of the Episcopal Church. He was formerly the bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Lexington (KY). Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR John Harris says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA March 28, 2012 at 9:16 pm Wednesday, March 28, 2012Dear God,I write to you because my heart is sad; nay, my heart is heavy and I am filled with fear and disbelief. I am bewildered, surprised, nay shocked. Because no arrest has been made. And I am convinced that had Trayvon been white and Zimmerman been black, an arrest would long since have taken place and bail set sufficiently high that there would be no risk of flight and security watch kept so strong that the suspect would not have opportunity to try self-infliction. I just can’t believe that here we are in the twenty-first century; a crime – murder — has been committed; there appears to be enough circumstantial evidence to at least name a suspect; but no arrest has been made. No, I am not a lawyer; Yes I know I have mixed in some technical legal terms in this letter to you. But you know what I mean — had the situation been reversed, an arrest would have been made. One writer says do not dismay; there must be good reason why; I can’t imagine what the good reason is why an arrest has not been made; another argument says perhaps all the facts are not yet in …I thought all the facts came out at a trial; now I wonder whether there will ever be a trial. Dear God, can you please reveal to me why an arrest has not been made? I just can’t believe things are going down this way. Some may counter – be more specific – what do I mean by this way…which way. I can’t answer all of that. But what I do know is Had the circumstances been exactly the same except for the race/color reversal, Trayvon – white, Zimmerman– Black, an arrest would long have been made. To be honest, I cannot articulate 5 points or three points or two points right now. I’m just too wrought with disbelief over the thought that won’t go away. No arrest –no arrest – no arrest. That’s all I got to say – the waters of justice at present seem to be receding instead of rolling down. Lack of an arrest, it seems to me, is a threat to justice everywhere. Until an arrest is made, I grieve for our nation and for our justice system. But I know your justice will prevail. O God arise and help us. Amen. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Racial Justice & Reconciliation Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

Historian recalls challenges of her call to professional lay ministry

first_imgHistorian recalls challenges of her call to professional lay ministry Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest April 5, 2012 at 2:23 pm To Susan Kreamer….Many thanks for your reminder about the discrepancy of recognition in the church arts! In the Sixties and early Seventies, there was a burst of interest in ecclesiastical stitchery and the design of eucharistic and altar vestments and I knew and rejoiced in the work of a number of women artists. Their work was both aesthetically and theologically exciting. But you’re right…stitchery hasn’t begun to receive the recognition it deserves. And I’m thinking about the work of members of my parish Altar Guild which hasn’t been raised to the level of the art donated by male members! That’s something I can perhaps rectify at least in my own parish. Interesting, how we relegate so much skillful and devoted work to the realm of “women’s work, God bless ’em.” Submit a Press Release Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Women’s Ministry April 5, 2012 at 3:47 pm Martha, My face is red for having mistaken your first name! I’m so sorry.Alda April 4, 2012 at 5:49 pm Dear Alda Morgan,Thank you, thank you. As an ordained woman who served most of her life as a laywoman, I am so aware of the challenges that faced you in following your calling. There are no words to express the gratitude I feel to you and the other pioneers and sustainers of the church.My heart breaks to hear of the loss of your job following women’s ordination. It is my hope and prayer that, ultimately, the ordination of women will result in the elevation of respect and honor awarded the work of those who choose lay service, as a calling, since it is no longer what is left-over that the men won’t do. It especially grieves me to see the contrast between the recognition given male artisans and female ones. Silver, stained glass, and carved wood all are dearly priced and purchased, and the artists named and acclaimed. But the lost art of stitchery, the embroidery and fine handwork done to enhance the altar, with prayers woven into every stitch, were, for the most part, donated to the glory of God by the women who did them. No dedication was held, and their names were not recorded. They remain anonymous. Sadly, their work, being deemed “free” is simply discarded when it becomes worn, or which the colors go out of fashion.Soon, if it is not already gone, that practice will have faded into oblivion, with no one being taught to carry on the craft.Long life and blessings to you! Jeffrey Knox says: Richard Rader says: Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags April 4, 2012 at 9:34 pm Dear Alda,What a treat to read your story, most of which I was unaware of while at CDSP madly pursuing my MDiv and commuting from home where husband and three kids awaited me. I am sorry I didn’t have or make the time to get to know you better then. The unintended consequence of women’s ordination you experienced was both unfair and painful, yet I knew you only as gracious and caring. Thank you for all the gifts you have given the church, and especially for your determination to find a way to offer them when doors closed in your face. Blessings to you. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Martha Kreamer says: April 4, 2012 at 9:59 pm I’d be extraordinarily interested in, and grateful for, anyone’s explanation of what they mean, what they believe, how they know, what they think are the measures of their being “..called..” It is used so very often by someone who is, in most instances, simply moving to another parish, another profession, another…. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Lynn W. Hubewr says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Comments (12) robert maury hundley says: Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Comments are closed. April 5, 2012 at 10:44 am Dear Alda,Thank you so much for all you’ve done to promote women’s ministries in the church. I remember with great fondness working with you at UC Canterbury in 1986. Coming from an academic background (my ex husband was a professor) I always had thought of campus ministry as focusing on students period, but you broadened my view point and I really enjoyed the meetings you shared with faculty, and your real understanding of faculty concerns. You taught me a lot – as much as any priest I encountered on my journey. Submit an Event Listing April 5, 2012 at 1:19 pm Alda, You might have know Dick Cheatham, who was a Dean at Pacific. He resigned as an Army Chaplain when the Chief of Chaplains on behalf of his wife demanded that Dick’s working wife be the hostess for a Chaplain’s wives event. I always thought he was courageous. BTW I rejoice that my seminary classmates at UTS are now ordained, but it appears that some women are now ordained because they are woman (which is Soviet style in which loyal membership in the communist party took the place of seminary preparation, leaving the church w/ no one to challenge the absence of values in the state). Warmest Best Wishes, Under the Lamb, Rev Robert M Hundley Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Jo Wright says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 April 4, 2012 at 8:22 pm Excellent points, Martha Kreamer. Fascinating story, Sharon about a most worthy subject, Alda Marsh Morgan, who had and has much to say to the church. I have great respect for clergy, male and female, but would like to think that laypeople’s gifts are on an equal footing. Submit a Job Listingcenter_img Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA By Sharon SheridanPosted Apr 4, 2012 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York [Episcopal News Service] This is one of a series of articles by ENS examining women’s history in the church.Alda Marsh Morgan says women’s ordination has been a mixed blessing for the role of women in the Episcopal Church. Photo/Alda Marsh MorganIn the church, discussions of “call” often center on ordination. But Alda Marsh Morgan of Berkeley, California, followed a call to professional lay ministry – a call that, ironically, was disrupted when women’s ordination became possible in the Episcopal Church.Born in 1939 in Dayton, Ohio, Morgan grew up in a Baptist parsonage but became an Episcopalian while attending Oberlin College (http://new.oberlin.edu/). After graduating, she entered the Episcopal Church’s Apprenticeship Program, “which provided women a year of internship in various ministries to test a vocation as a lay woman church worker,” Morgan said in an ENS interview conducted via e-mail. “Although my internship was in a social-work agency, I already knew that I wanted to be a campus minister.”She next entered St. Margaret’s House in Berkeley, one of a handful of schools that trained Episcopal deaconesses. Deaconesses were officially recognized as an order of women in the Episcopal Church “set apart” for servant ministry but not as ordained deacons, Morgan explained, adding that she was uninterested in becoming a deaconess. She earned a master’s degree in Christian education and accepted a position at what now is West Chester State University, southwest of Philadelphia, to begin a ministry based at Holy Trinity Episcopal Church. “My supervisor was the diocesan director of campus ministry, but I was considered part of the parish staff.”At her supervisor’s encouragement, she organized an ecumenical ministry sponsored by six local congregations – Baptist, Episcopal, Lutheran, two Presbyterian, and United Church of Christ. “Those six years were immensely satisfying, as I got there just as the college was beginning to broaden its formerly educational programs to liberal arts. The ’60s were a time of great change and stir, and Bishop [Robert] DeWitt’s leadership on the diocesan level was exhilarating. I was part of his ‘cadre’ of supporters and colleagues, and it seemed as if a new sun was rising and everything was a possibility.”But that same leadership helped precipitate a “severe shortfall of diocesan funding” that led her to leave. “His strong support for civil rights and other liberal causes raised a lot of opposition in what was then a conservative diocese,” she said.“I had left because my work with the local churches in a small county seat raised questions for me about the relationship between American Protestantism and higher education, so I went back to Berkeley for a doctorate in history. … I looked upon my graduate work as professional continuing education.”She entered the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, becoming involved both in campus ministries and at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, and seriously considered the possibility of ordination. “We talk about ‘discernment’ now, and my decision was that I wasn’t called to the ordained ministry, but … did have a calling to ministry as a lay woman.”While she was a college student and afterward, she said, “there was a robust community of professional women church workers, supported by the church, although not widely understood at the grassroot levels.”“Most of us were in Christian education, but many of us were in social work (for church related agencies) and campus ministry. Many women, like myself, had begun campus ministries, later relinquishing them to clergy. My thinking then was that it was a tossup as to which was the bigger obstacle for me and other women workers – being a woman or being a lay person. After the ordination of women was passed [by the General Convention in 1976], I learned the answer: It was being a lay professional in a clerical church.“What happened, with startling speed, was that most of us lost our jobs. Much of the work that women workers had done depended on the need for ministries in areas that male clergy either wouldn’t touch or where they cost more than the women. My supervisor had told me up front that he looked for a woman for West Chester because he couldn’t afford to pay a clergyman. … But the bottom line for me after 1976 was that the vocation to which I was passionately committed – campus ministry – was no longer available to me. The last position I applied to was at Northwestern and, notwithstanding my education and experience, I was told I was out of the running because I wasn’t a priest. Ironically, the job went to a woman priest, a friend and a damned good minister.”“Subsequently, I made work for myself in campus ministry—as the volunteer provincial coordinator of ministry in higher education for Province VIII and then, in a program I designed … LEAVEN, a three-year ministry development program with faculty and staff at [the University of California]. While working in LEAVEN, I was asked to consult nationwide by colleagues who wanted help with their faculty/staff ministries. But it wasn’t until I was hired as the interim director of continuing education at [Church Divinity School of the Pacific] in 1989 that I again held a paid position working for the church. I worked in that department under three deans until 2003, when I took early retirement. Theological education became my new ‘vocation,’ but I never lost my yearning for and commitment to campus ministry. It took years to recover from the anger and resentment I felt once I realized that I was, in effect, barred from that work.”Morgan married Donn Morgan, who became CDSP’s dean and president, in 1975 and received her doctoral degree in 1984. “My own field is American religious and intellectual history with a specialty in higher education and its relationships with the churches,” she said. Her work has included research and writing about women church workers. “I think it’s a great story, and I am so pleased that in recent years the women seminarians at CDSP and women elsewhere are beginning to broaden their interest in their past to include the women missionaries, the sisters, deaconesses and church workers as their foremothers.”She sees the advances women have made in leadership roles in the church – from governance to ordination – as “positive for the church’s mission in many ways and way, way overdue.”“On the other hand,” she said, “the possibility of ordination has closed the ranks for lay women who wish to serve the church professionally.”“Finally, oddly, when women had to work through segregated organizations – the Women’s Auxiliary, the Order of Deaconesses, the Division of Women’s Work – we had a spirit and a sense of mutual community and support that we seem to lack now.” While not looking to return to the past, she said, “I grow a little wistful about the loss of esprit that we once had.”Through the years, she has served the church at all levels, including as a member of the Standing Commission on Ecumenical Relations and as a representative to the National Council of Churches General Assembly. “In all these various forms of service and ministry,” she concluded, “I suspect that my advocacy of the importance of education is the connecting link – even when it isn’t obvious.”Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Alda Morgan says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Freda Marie says: Solange De Santis says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ April 6, 2012 at 1:28 pm Thanks for your story, Alda. I was pleased to see it on ENS post today, and send cheers and blessings to both you and Donn. – Jon Davidson, Lake Tahoe Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Jon Davidson says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Alda Morgan says: April 6, 2012 at 11:32 am @ Alda: Thank you for your SERVICE…you have obviously been doing this work in the name of Our [email protected]: Thank you for your insight…Amen to your words. April 5, 2012 at 8:56 am What a wonderful story for us to read for Holy Week. Without the laity steadfast determination, and dedication to keep the Ministry going, even when resources are cut, and the game plan gets changed. In Christ we are neither male or female…but all are ONE! A 70 year old cradle Episcopalian still discovering this ONENESS! Margaret Irwin says: Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group April 5, 2012 at 2:34 pm I am very interested in this!First, as a spiritual director, it has been my experience that often when people get really excited about their faith, others become uncomfortable, and ask them, “Have you thought about going to seminary/becoming clergy?” If our baptism is a call to 24/7/365 ministry, then whether we are paid by the church or not, we are all “called.”I’ve been a paid, full-time diocesan staff person, a licensed preacher in three dioceses, a secularly-employed social worker and professor of social work, a volunteer spiritual director, a paid teacher of spiritual direction (part time), a volunteer prison minister, a paid retreat leader, a gardener, a friend, a hiker, a wife … all are part of my living out my ‘call.’Sometimes when folks ask me if I ever thought of ordination, I say that I feel called to be an ‘iconic lay person’, helping others to see that their baptism IS a call to full-time ministry.I have a bunch of friends who are priests, almost all of whom I knew well before their ordinations. They tell me that ordination often makes them lose friends. And clericalism surely survives well in spite of the “new” prayer book’s listing of the ministers as “lay persons, (note this is first), bishops, priests and deacons). It’s very hard to move large systems. But Alda’s contribution to the conversation is welcome and very helpful, and perhaps may help us to be more aware and to move a bit. I am grateful to have ‘met’ her in this story.Blessings on all of us, and on this hurting world, as we live out Holy Week together,Lynn W. Huber Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL last_img read more

Church delegates to bring ethical perspectives to Rio+20 summit

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service [Ecumenical News International] A delegation from the Geneva-based World Council of Churches (WCC) will take part in the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (UNCSD) from June 20-22 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.The delegates will participate in various ecumenical and interfaith events at the conference, also known as Rio+20, according to a WCC news release. It marks the 20th anniversary of the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), in Rio de Janeiro, and the 10th anniversary of the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) in Johannesburg.The WCC said it will also participate in the Peoples’ Summit for Social and Environmental Justice, an event taking place June 15-23 in Rio de Janeiro alongside Rio+20. The People’s Summit will “propose a new way of living on the planet, in solidarity against the commodification of nature,” according to its website.“We hope that the results of Rio will effectively reflect a larger ‘we,’ including in particular the most vulnerable and poor communities in the world,” said Guillermo Kerber, WCC program executive on climate change, who is facilitating the WCC delegation to Rio+20.“WCC delegates will focus on highlighting ethical concerns, and religious insights in a number of events which we have organized, in addition to the intense advocacy efforts to be carried out at the UNCSD,” he added.The WCC program for eco-justice is organizing a series of side events both at the UNCSD and the People’s Summit. One will focus on “ethical and religious insights on the future we want,” which echoes the expected title of the outcome document of Rio+20 (“The future we want”). It is anticipated the document will include a call for action and commitments by the participating countries.The WCC gathering will take place on June 22 and include a message from Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I of Constantinople. WCC Central Committee moderator the Rev. Walter Altmann will be one of the speakers among other religious leaders. The event has been co-organized by the WCC with Caritas Internationalis, the Lutheran World Federation and Religions for Peace.On June 17, another WCC event will address the theme “Ethical implications of sustainability: educational and religious perspectives.” The WCC has organized this event with the Baptist World Alliance, the General Board of Church and Society of the United Methodist Church, Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns, the International Forum on Human Rights (FIDH), the University of Washington and other partners.To address the “spirituality and ethics of water”, the Ecumenical Water Network of the WCC joins with United Religions Initiative and Faith without Borders on June 18. An interfaith panel will be led by theologian Reijo E. Heinonen, founding dean of the ecumenical theological faculty of the University of Joensuu in Finland.Other events where WCC delegates will contribute include a seminar on “The Rio+20 Legacy: an inter-generational dialogue on sustainability” on June 13. This event will be organized by Beyond 2015, the Global Campaign for Climate Action (GCCA).Besides these events, a program on the theme “Religions for Rights” has been developed for the Peoples’ Summit by the Ecumenical Coordination office. The office was established in March by Koinonia, an ACT Alliance member organization in Rio, and is led by Marcelo Schneider, the WCC’s communication liaison for Latin America.The program will bring together ecumenical and inter-religious participants for events in seven different tents at the Peoples’ Summit. As part of the activities, a vigil will take place on the night of June 17.“Our original idea was to promote an expressive spiritual event organized with the members of our ecumenical inter-religious initiative,” said Schneider. “But the People’s Summit coordination group adopted the idea, and now the vigil is going to be part of the overall program at the event.”“We had to adapt our language and symbolism to include many different expressions and movements of civil society. The vigil will focus on the four basic elements of life and the rights we are advocating for,” Schneider added.WCC activities at the Peoples’ Summit will include workshops on the “WCC and the Rio Convention on Climate Change” and “Climate and Human Responsibility for Creation.”More information is available at the WCC’s website: http://www.oikoumene.org. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Anglican Communion, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Church delegates to bring ethical perspectives to Rio+20 summit The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ecumenical & Interreligious, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing By ENInews StaffPosted Jun 12, 2012 Environment & Climate Change The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OHlast_img read more

Video: Talking about religion, growing in faith

first_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Frank Jacobson says: Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Video: Talking about religion, growing in faith Dan Herron says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ecumenical & Interreligious, Rector Knoxville, TN October 1, 2012 at 7:18 pm I am happy to see sons of Abraham come together. Yes, they do get! Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Release Comments are closed. Featured Events thomas mauro says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab [Episcopal News Service] Diocese of Newark Bishop Mark Beckwith, Rabbi Matthew Gewirtz of Temple B’Nai Jeshurun in Short Hills, New Jersey, and Imam W. Deen Shareef of Masjid Waarith ud Deen in nearby Irvington have worked together to serve the people in the sometimes violence-ridden city of Newark, New Jersey, for the last five years. Each says their relationship has helped them grow in faith. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY October 1, 2012 at 7:39 pm This is an inspiring story and one which desperately needs to be duplicated in every diocese of the Episcopal Church. I am hoping to have this kind of interfaith witness in the Diocese of the Rio Grande and have already begun entering into intimate religious dialogues and nurturing loving relationships. Thank you Bishop Mark and the Diocese of Newark. Bless you. Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA October 1, 2012 at 11:43 pm Love God of your own and love each other irrespective of one’s faith on deity of one’s God/gods. All faiths including atheism teach love for humanity. If all faiths practice what they preach, there should not be any turmoil in the name of God/gods or no-god. God/gods of any religion are the supreme authority and God/gods do not need human hand to protect God/gods’ supremacy. Respecting individual human rights, all faith should have right to propagate their own believe as per their religious teaching. We are living in an imperfect world and dialogue is the way to know each other. It is appreciable taking this courageous step at a time when world is in turmoil because of misunderstanding among different faiths. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 1, 2012 Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Smithfield, NC October 1, 2012 at 6:43 pm Some people get it. some don’t. these GENTLEmen get it. Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Bishop Michael Vono says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC P.J. Cabbiness says: Video This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA October 1, 2012 at 7:31 pm This kind of sustained dialogue among members of the Abrahamic faiths should be very precious to us. I can’t help believing that God, as great and wise as we all believe God to be, smiles on such attempts to advance understanding. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Julian Malakar says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem October 1, 2012 at 6:42 pm Beware of the wolf in Sheep’s clothing. I understand the good intentions but we know what the road to hell is paved with. This is disheartening. Comments (6) New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more

Episcopal Church of the Philippines issues disaster response report

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Name of Community AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Posted Dec 12, 2013 144 Number of Families Served 128 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET 106 Panugmunon, Marabut, Western Samar Episcopal Church of the Philippines issues disaster response report New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Odoc, Marabut, Western Samar Amambucale, Marabut, Western Samar Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA The full text of a disaster response report issued by the Episcopal Church of the Philippines on Dec. 10 follows.THE ECP DISASTER RESPONSE WORKThe Philippines is “the most-exposed  country in the world to tropical cyclo0nes or typhoons.” There are accordingly around 19 typhoons that enter the Philippine Area of Responsibility in a typical year and 6 to 9 of these usually make landfall.It is said that it is in times of sorrow and disaster that the best in the Filipino is manifested and practiced. If there is any bright spot to the catastrophic landscape brought about by the destructive typhoons, it is the immediate response of the Filipino people, even those directly affected, wanting to help fellow Filipinos. Donations from all over the country usually come pouring in, not only from the coffers of rich corporations or institutions or enclaves of the rich but more so from millions of simple folks sharing a peso or a kilo of rice just to be able to save or feed others. Volunteerism for rescue and relief operations remain strong, with many volunteers risking and a few even losing their lives to bring much needed assistance to people clutching on the straw of life.Partnering with typhoon-affected communities to rebuild their lives has always been a part of the social ministry of the Episcopal Church in the Philippines (ECP) and it has always worked to enhance the positive values and practices, such as bayanihan, ub-ubbo and galatis,  that surface during these times of disaster.  Yet it is also a reality that the Church’s work has oftentimes resulted in the unintended consequence of creating and/or strengthening dole-out mentality among receiving communities. The ECP has endeavored to address this undesirable phenomenon by crafting a relief response program within the framework of sustainable development. Also in recent years, the ECP has relied more heavily upon the support and action of its members and congregations to be able to do an effective response, a complete reversal of the situations in times past when the Church and its people immediately looked up to the grace of foreign partners and donors for relief assistance whenever disaster struck.  At the height of Typhoon Pablo which hit Mindanao in December 2012, the ECP dioceses, institutions and congregations raised more than half a million pesos in relief funds.Following a more sustainable development approach, the ECP  puts  more focus on what it refers to as developmental relief and rehabilitation of livelihoods which it does with  affected communities when emergency relief responses are nearing conclusion and when most relief agencies are going home. Such approach to rehabilitation work seeks to do away with dole-outs and outright grants.  As an aftermath of  Typhoon Ondoy [Ketsana] and Peping  in 2009, the ECP initiated community loan programs in the municipality of Cabiao, Nueva Ecija and in Licab, Sta. Maria also in Nueva Ecija and the funds that have been loaned out to these groups have been paid, re-loaned and continues to be rolled over to the participating communities with new groups joining in every year. The original fund assistance contributed by the Episcopal Relief and Development and Nippon Sei Ko Kai remains intact and is even growing as soft interests were paid and ploughed back to capital in subsequent loan cycles. When Typhoon Santi [Nari] hit Nueva Ecija in October 2013, Licab was again directly hit. Many houses were damaged and the community, through Annunciation Cooperative, applied for a non-interest loan of P115,000 to rebuild the same. The ECP agreed to the requested repayment period of two (2) years.  Earlier, in August 2013, Typhoon Labuyo [Utor] hit the provinces of Isabela, Quirino and Aurora. The congregation of St. Cyril Church in Diduyon, Maddela, Quirino commenced a farm assistance project to enable farmers to re-plant their wiped-out crops. They asked for a non-interest loan of P300,000. These communities have express that for a long time that typhoons have been  destroying their lands, they have relied on the grace of outsiders but such reliance has made them more helpless and their self-worth greatly reduced. Hence, they now prefer to do loans instead of outright grants because this helps them maintain and enhance their dignity and self-worth. It is the current policy of the ECP to continually roll over all repayments for these rehabilitation efforts so that the participating communities move from rehabilitation to more longer term livelihood enhancement.SUPER-TYPHOON YOLANDAOn 8th November 2013, a super-typhoon, which accordingly is the strongest land-falling tropical cyclone ever recorded,  hit the central part of the Philippines and turned several regions into a complete wasteland. As of 4th December, the government’s National Disaster Risk Reduction Management Council [NDRRMC] reported that the number of fatalities from Typhoon Yolanda [international name: Haiyan] has climbed to 5,719, with 1,779 persons still missing and 26,233 others injured. A total of 11.26 million persons or 2.38 million families have been affected, with property damage estimated at P34.37 billion.In response, a wave of support swept the entire country and many communities, including those previously hit by similar disasters, rose up to offer what they can. The disaster also captured the attention of the international community which immediately responded bringing with them, among others, expertise and technologies un-available in the country to do recovery work in what has become a global effort.THE ECP RESPONSEThe ECP joined the nation in praying for those whose lives were tragically lost and broken in the ferocious path of the super typhoon. As expected, its congregations responded with dispatch. Cash, boxes of clothing, sacks of rice, boxes of canned goods and other food stuff were donated for the affected communities. [See Annex I for the Partial List of Donations.]Because of the massive scale of devastation, the ECP not only welcomed but also encouraged the pledge of churches and agencies of the world-wide Anglican Communion, which likewise made immediate offers of assistance.  Through the Global Anglican Alliance for Relief and Development, a teleconference was held on 19th November 2013 where the ECP was requested to present its Yolanda response plans to its Anglican partner agencies. Participating in the teleconference were representatives from Episcopal Relief and Development [ERD], Anglican Board of Mission [ABM] – Australia, Primate’s Fund for World Relief and Development [PWRDF], Anglican Development [Diocese of Melbourne].Using the sustainable development approach, the ECP crafted a relief and rehabilitation program that will be implemented in three phases: a] emergency relief; b] developmental relief; and, c]  livelihood rehabilitation.For the first phase, the ECP established linkage with the National Council of Churches in the Philippines [NCCP] which provided the network and access to appropriate communities urgently needing relief assistance. The first boxes of foodstuff and clothings from various congregations, institutions and dioceses of the ECP were directly brought to the NCCP for immediate dispatch to the affected communities. At that time, there was difficulty bringing relief goods to the most affected areas due to the closure of damaged roads, airports and sea ports and the NCCP was among the few officially-accredited relief agencies prioritized to avail of the limited access.To get an on-the-ground experience and to discuss with ground staff of NCCP the areas where ECP relief will be focused, two (2) ECP staff person visited Tacloban and Eastern Samar on 25th – 28th  November 2013. On 26th November 2013, the ECP sent two truckloads, consisting of 2,200 food packs, to communities recommended by the ground staff of the NCCP, as follows:29th November 2013 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Sto. Nino, Marabut, Western Samar Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Pinalangga, Marabut, Western Samar Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Episcopal Diocese of Davao, whose territorial jurisdiction includes Eastern Visayas, focused its relief work on Bantayan Island. On 27th – 28th November 2013, it organized a medical mission, led by medical personnel of the ECP’s Bent Hospital in Zamboanga City and participated in by medical professionals from the Anglican Diocese of Sabah. It also distributed 1,500 food packs to Barangays Okoy and Balidbid, both of Santa Fe, Bantayan Island.The ECP’s relief work has two distinguishing  features: a] mobilization of foodstuff produced and processed by its communities; and, b]  installation of solar lighting system in evacuation and relief distribution centers.Disaster food relief usually consists of rice, noodles and canned goods. For immediate and short term relief, these food items may be acceptable but for longer term operation, the effect of these foods on consumers’ health or nutrition becomes a serious issue. Hence, the ECP is  mobilizing and using more healthful foods that are produced and processed by its communities, more specifically: vegetable noodles,  packed vegetables, camote biscuits and insumix [an easy to cook mix of dried rice, legumes and fish]. To be able to produce one (1) to three (3) tons of these food items to complete a truckload however involves the coordinative work of various communities and households working together and complementing each other – from mobilization of raw materials to actual processing. In fact, these food items constituted only a small portion of the first two truckloads as it took sometime to scale up the food processing operations . These  community-prepared and processed foods will however make up the bulk of relief goods starting with the second relief mission in mid-December and onwards.Lighting has become an urgent need in view of the destruction of sources of power in the worst-affected areas. Every night when it gets dark, affected communities relive the horrors of the deadly storm surges that came in the middle of the night of 8th November. The ECP staff who visited these areas observed that people were congregating on roadsides at night-time to get relief from the lights of passing vehicles. Also, light was needed as protection against possible violence on women and children.In some areas, generators were in use but these require gas fuel which are in short supply. Hence, the ECP mobilized its competence in community solar lighting systems and organized its first trip to Leyte and Samar for this purpose on 4th December. The solar lighting team also brought with them 200 relief packs for distribution which included hygiene kits that contained, among others, herbal soap produced by an ECP community [see story below]. As of this writing, seven [7] systems have already been installed in major evacuation centers, as follows:UCCP Center, Tacloban, Leyte being used as NCCP Field OfficeGiit Barangay Center, Giit, Tacloban, LeyteSeawall Barangay Center, Tacloban, LeyteIFI Church, Jinamoc Island, Basey, SamarIFI Sto Nino Church, Poblacion, Marabut, SamarBalud Barangay Hall/Evacuation Center, Balud, Basey, SamarPalaypay Barangay Hall, Palaypay, Basey, SamarSawa Barangay Hall, Sawa, Basey, SamarPanama Barangay Hall, Marabut, Samar(presently being installed)Carmen Drop Off Center, Carmen, Hernani, SamarUCCP Church, Porblacion Uno, Hernani, SamarDrop off Center, Hernani, SamarInstallation of the solar lighting systems was made in the above communities which agreed that when power supply is resumed in their areas, the systems will be transferred to other centers or more remote areas that have yet to be reached by such power supply.IMMEDIATE PLANSA meeting is scheduled on 16th December to draw up a program for Year 2014. This will be participated in by Ms. Sara Delaney who is currently in the Philippines, consulting with ECP on the disaster response work.  The developmental relief and livelihood rehabilitation work shall take two tracks: a] working with specifically identified communities which do not have other partners; and, b] partnering with social enterprises in the affected areas that have been adversely affected. Initial explorations on these two tracks are currently being done.Meanwhile, two (2) relief delivery operations are scheduled on the third week of December. Also, a plan is being made for the possibility of sending youth and BSA volunteers to Tacloban after Christmas to do a clean-up of debris being hauled off to a dumping site for the purpose of salvaging materials that can be used for house rebuilding. This is being planned in coordination with Tsu Chi Foundation.STORIESSince the ECP is not directly involved in relief distribution, it has no community engagements at the present time that has enabled it to observe and gather stories of people trying to get back on their feet.  The inspiring stories it has gathered so far are those that relate to the un-affected communities” efforts to be in solidarity with their brothers and sisters in the devastated regions, such as the following:1]         The Amtuagan Community Association of  Brgy.  Amtuagan, Tubo, Abra has a soap-making enterprise established under the ECP’s Development Program in 2011. This is a small-scale venture owing to the community’s difficulty of access to  bigger markets.  The road to the community from the town center is open only during dry months. Hence, the women soap makers would make soap only during these months when they can then take passenger jeeps to bring the products either for sale at the provincial capital of Bangued or send them by bus to the Episcopal Church centers [in Bontoc, Baguio or Manila]. When requested to make herbal soap for Yolanda relief,  the women did not hesitate to respond positively even if it meant manually carrying the soap products in a one-and-a-half-hour hike from the community to the town center as the road to the community is impassable for motor vehicles at this time. As of this writing, a total of 1,700 pieces of soap have been included in the hygiene kits as aforestated – soaps that were manually transported, without any additional costs, through the shoulders of men and women of Amtuagan who felt it was the least they could do to help the suffering communities.2]        The members of Anunciation Cooperative in Licab, Sta Maria, Nueva Ecija who borrowed a total of P115,000 to rebuild their homes damaged by Typhoon Santi [Nari] in October 2013 resolved to shorten the repayment period from two (2) years to one (1) year to make the borrowed fund available for similar rebuilding of homes in Yolanda devastated areas.3]         The team monitoring the camote processing in Besao, Mountain Province to ensure quality standards reported that in their inspection of the processing in the houses where it was being done, they observed that the women processors are now joined by their husbands. Previously, the latter considered camote processing a woman’s work and had never lent a hand in the activity. However, when they learned that the product was intended as relief for the super typhoon victims, husbands gave their full cooperation and assumed responsibility for the more challenging work of manual pounding or grinding of camote into flour. The monitoring team said those husbands are among the men who usually congregate after farm work for liquor drinking sessions every afternoon. The women processors therefore now have an added reason to be thankful for the opportunity to serve their suffering brothers and sisters.4]         In Caranglan, San Jose, Nueva Ecija where the ECP did a water project some years ago, a woman noticed a truck of the Episcopal Diocese of Santiago carrying sacks of rice that was parked along the highway on its way to Manila. When she learned that the rice was intended for Yolanda affected communities, she asked the driver to wait as she went to her house and got one (1) sack of rice which she donated to the relief effort. She said she also experienced devastation in her community caused by a previous typhoon. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Anglican Communion, Submit a Job Listing 639 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Guirang, Marabut, Western Samar Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Amantillo, Marabut, Western Samar Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing Asia Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC 206 Lipata, Marabut, Western Samar Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Catato, Marabut, Western Samar Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET 155 248 Rector Bath, NC 160 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ferreras, Marabut, Western Samar Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 1st December 2013 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI 207 Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET 207last_img read more

East Carolina diocese elects Robert Skirving as bishop

first_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME June 5, 2014 at 4:09 pm Congratulations to you!And to your family also! Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC fR. lESLIE hARDING says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bill Murphy says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Bishop Elections, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem People Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit an Event Listing May 20, 2014 at 9:16 am ROB: CONGRATULATIONS ! I WISH YOU AND SANDY EVERY GOOD WISH IN THE NEW WORK YOU HAVE BEEN CALLED TO DO! GOD BLESS! Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Danny Anderson says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments (4) Tags House of Bishops, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY East Carolina diocese elects Robert Skirving as bishop Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel center_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Lorraine Saviano says: Rector Shreveport, LA May 19, 2014 at 11:23 pm I give thanks to God for our Bishop elect. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR [Episcopal Diocese of East Carolina] The Rev. Robert Skirving, rector of St. John’s Church in Midland, Michigan, was elected as the 8th bishop of the Diocese of East Carolina on May 17, pending the required consents from a majority of bishops with jurisdiction and standing committees of the Episcopal Church.Skirving was elected on the third ballot, receiving 48 of the 70 clergy votes and 97 of the 165 lay votes. Thirty-six clergy votes and 84 lay votes were needed for an election. The first ballot was invalidated due to a procedural error.The election was held during a reconvened session of the 131st Convention held at Christ Church, New Bern, North Carolina.Pending consents, the consecration and ordination of the bishop-elect is scheduled to take place on Saturday, Nov. 8, at the Rock Springs Center in Greenville, North Carolina, with Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori presiding. Under the canons (III.11.4) of the Episcopal Church, a majority of bishops exercising jurisdiction and diocesan standing committees must consent to the bishop-elect’s ordination as bishop within 120 days of receiving notice of the election.“Sandy and I are excited that God has called us to East Carolina to journey forward with you,” Skirving said in a phone call broadcast through the nave shortly after his election was announced. “I am grateful for the trust you have placed in me, and I am confident God will give us everything we need to do the work of the church.”Skirving has been rector of St. John’s Episcopal Church since 2005. He currently serves on the House of Deputies State of the Church Committee and represents the Diocese of Eastern Michigan on the Province V Executive Board. He was a deputy to General Convention in 2012 and has served his diocese as dean and chair of its Commission on Ministry.Previously, Skirving served as rector of Bishop Cronyn Memorial Church in London, Ontario, Canada. His work in Canada provided him experience working in churches of varying sizes, from small rural to large, program-sized congregations in suburban and urban areas.He was awarded a BA in Philosophy from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada in 1982. He received his Master of Divinity degree from Huron University College in London, Ontario in 1986. He has completed additional course work towards advanced degrees in religious studies and congregational development at the University of Windsor, University of Notre Dame and Seabury Institute.He and his wife Sandy have two grown children. He has begun to learn Latin-American Spanish to help in his congregation’s ongoing mission partnership with the Episcopal Church in the Dominican Republic.The other nominees were:The Rev. Mary Cecilia (Mimi) Lacy, rector, St. Timothy’s Church, Greenville, North Carolina;The Rev. Canon David Pfaff, canon to the ordinary, Diocese of Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; andThe Rev. Stephen Smith, rector, St. Patrick’s Church, Dublin, Ohio.The Diocese of East Carolina is composed of nearly 70 parishes in 32 counties and covers the area from I-95 to the coast and from Southport up to Gatesville. The diocese is home to several major military bases, a large Hispanic community, and small congregations. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC By diocesan staffPosted May 19, 2014 September 9, 2014 at 9:56 am Rob, Congratulations on your election as Bishop of the East Carolina Diocese. I wish both you and Sandy all the best in your new role. I am enjoying being fully retired from church music now but am grateful for the years we worked together at St. Marks which drew me back to a very fulfilling closing chapter in my church music career.Kindest regards,Bill Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

Anglican and Oriental Orthodox churches reach historic agreements

first_img Comments (1) Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Ecumenical & Interreligious Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Comments are closed. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL October 13, 2015 at 7:54 pm This is good news. While I look forward to reading or learning about the agreed statement on Christology, I am most inspired and hopeful about the reported goal to work on what we share rather than try to resolve all the theological disagreements between the two camps as a prerequisite to unity. The observation that this kind of Christian unity is especially needed in a context of inter-faith dialogue. Reaching out to other faiths while ignoring what separates Christians is an odd state of affairs and I’m glad that the two families of churches are working on strengthening what we, as Christians, can share as we face brothers and sisters of other faiths. Perhaps this might be a model for other groups that are divided, not just religious communities? The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN Anglican and Oriental Orthodox churches reach historic agreements Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 center_img Members of the Anglican – Oriental Orthodox International Commission outside St. Asaph Cathedral, Wales. Photo: Nathaniel Ramanaden[Anglican Communion News Service] Historic agreements have been signed between Anglican and Oriental Orthodox churches helping to heal the oldest continuing division within Christianity.An Agreed Statement on Christology, published in North Wales last week by the Anglican-Oriental Orthodox International Commission (AOOIC), heals the centuries-old split between the Anglican churches within the family of Chalcedonian Churches and the non-Chalcedonian churches over the incarnation of Christ.In addition, the Commission has made substantial progress on issues concerning the Holy Spirit, which have continued to keep the churches apart over the centuries.Leading clergy and theologians from both Christian traditions from around the world have been meeting at Gladstone’s Library in Hawarden to engage in theological dialogue, while at the same time forging deeper bonds of faith and mutual support.His Eminence Metropolitan Bishoy from the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria in Egypt and co-chair of the Commission said: “With this agreement we are able to heal the cause of the division between the two families of the churches worldwide which started at Chalcedon.“There are other things which emerged during the long history since Chalcedon in the fifth century, so we have on our agenda many other topics including the position of the Holy Spirit, which we were able to sign a preliminary agreement on this subject also.“The publication of our Agreed Statement on Christology is a great outcome of sharing dialogue together. It is a very beautiful piece of theology which is very encouraging and easily understandable to the people and pleasing to the theologians.”The Commission has spent a week in North Wales talking and visiting church communities across the Diocese of St. Asaph. Speaking during Evensong at St. Asaph Cathedral, the Anglican co-chair of the Commission, Bishop Gregory Cameron of St. Asaph, who hosted the visit, said: “It’s a privilege to welcome you to this building which has seen worship every day for at least 800 years, although this is a tradition which can be easily matched and bettered by the churches of the East.“Ecumenical dialogue can be long, but beneath the process is the love shared between Christians, and it is that love and affection which draws us together and back to dialogue and mutual understanding.”The Anglican-Oriental Orthodox International Commission was established in 2001 to strengthen the relationships between the different Churches and to discuss important theological issues, such as Christology, which divided the Church at the Council of Chalcedon in 451 AD.The dialogue was halted in 2003 following the consecration of Bishop Gene Robinson in the U.S.-based Episcopal Church but resumed in 2013 with good progress being made since.As well as dialogue, the Commission worshiped and prayed, sharing the urgent concerns of members from the Middle East, especially in the critical situations in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon and other regions. Metropolitan Polycarp Augin Aydın from the Syrian Orthodox Archdiocese in the Netherlands explained why this agreement is important now: “Because of immigration we now find ourselves side by side as neighbors. In the past we used to talk about Eastern and Western Christianity but this is no longer the case. There are Eastern Christians who live in the Western Countries and vice versa. Therefore we have to dialogue with each other and to really learn from one another and to really share our treasures with one another.”Bishop Angaelos, general bishop of the Coptic Orthodox Church in the U.K., said: “The world we are living in today is a world that needs us as Christians to stand together.“Around our commission table, we have the Armenians commemorating the Armenian Genocide, the Syrians and Iraqis whose countries are war-torn and peoples displaced, the Copts who have lost 21 of their men to that horrific martyrdom in Libya, the Ethiopians likewise in Libya, and here in Europe we also have our own struggles. It is very much time for us to stand together as Church leaders and to recognize what we have in common while at the same time respecting the differences we have.”“Over the past 15 years since 9/11 there has been a huge appetite for us to work with other religions but unfortunately I have not seen the same appetite for many people to work with other Churches. It becomes fashionable to be able to dialogue with inter-faith communities but we do not celebrate with each other or accept each other as we are; we want others to fit into a certain mould. So I think this dialogue acknowledges that we might have different teachings on things and some matters we may never resolve, and that is the reality of it, but we are not trying to be the same, we are trying to work on what we have in common.”For the two church families this agreement is ground-breaking and could be a model for future ecumenical dialogue. The Very Rev. Archimandrite Shahe Ananyan from the Armenian Apostolic Orthodox Church said: “Every signed ecumenical official document has its difficulties and has its advantages also. This document I think is a model for other Christological dialogues between Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox churches which need to re-start. I think this document could be served as a model for subsequently developed dialogues.”The Commission will meet again in Lebanon from October 24-29, 2016, where it is expected that dialogue on the Holy Spirit will continue. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release Featured Events Anglican Communion, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA By ACNS staffPosted Oct 12, 2015 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Alda Morgan says: Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

Peace in South Sudan requires Christians to follow the greatest…

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Posted Sep 20, 2017 Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska center_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA [Anglican Communion News Service] The solution to the conflict in South Sudan lies with committed Christians and the church rather than the government or international community, the archbishop of the internal province of Bahr el Ghazel has said. Writing in the September edition of “Renewal,” the province’s quarterly magazine, Archbishop Moses Deng Bol said that peace would come when Christians acted out Jesus’ teaching on the greatest commandment in Luke Chapter 10.Read the entire article here. Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing Anglican Communion, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Sudan & South Sudan Associate Rector Columbus, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Peace in South Sudan requires Christians to follow the greatest commandment In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH last_img read more

Young English adults still value church weddings, survey shows

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth & Young Adults Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Young English adults still value church weddings, survey shows Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET April 12, 2018 at 5:41 pm HMMMMM. A wedding is a 2-hour event after which everyone goes to another site for a celebration. The church is once again empty, with the wedding attendees unlike to return ever again, except maybe for another wedding.The question I have is what with and how do you evangelize amongst the secular English young? Does the church offer catechesis on the meaning of Christian marriage and sexual ethics? Anglican Communion, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls [Anglican Communion News Service] Research conducted for the Church of England suggests that almost three-quarters of unmarried adults younger than 35 still dream of getting married. The figure is taken from a survey conducted by 9Dot-Research for the Church of England’s Life Events team. It would appear to contradict statistics for the actual number of weddings, which show a continuing decline in both absolute numbers and in the rate: figures for opposite-sex marriage in 2015 show that there were 21.7 marriages per 1,000 unmarried men and 19.8 marriages per 1,000 unmarried women – the lowest rate on record.Read the entire article here. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Gordon Fuglie says: Submit a Job Listingcenter_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Posted Apr 12, 2018 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments (1) Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments are closed. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Rector Belleville, IL last_img read more