Johnson & Johnson keeps quiet on bid rumours despite reports

first_imgSunday 16 January 2011 10:33 pm Johnson & Johnson keeps quiet on bid rumours despite reports Share whatsapp KCS-content Show Comments ▼center_img whatsapp by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesBrake For ItThe Most Worthless Cars Ever MadeBrake For ItBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeAlphaCute30 Rules That All “Hells Angels” Have To FollowAlphaCuteDefinitionDesi Arnaz Kept This Hidden Throughout The Filming of ‘I Love Lucy’DefinitionTaonga: The Island FarmThe Most Relaxing Farm Game of 2021. No InstallTaonga: The Island Farmthedelite.comNetflix Cancellations And Renewals: The Full List For 2021thedelite.com JOHNSON & JOHNSON is a US manufacturer of healthcare, medical and pharmaceutical goods, founded in 1886 by three brothers in New Jersey. It has been a Fortune 500 company since 1978, with total sales for 2009 of $61.9bn (£39bn).Throughout the takeover rumours Johnson & Johnson has maintained that it does not comment on speculation, keeping its cards close to its chest on a bid for Smith & Nephew. The US giant is nearly 25 times larger than the UK company in market capitalisation terms.It has made it a sustained strategic goal to diversify its portfolio since the company was first established in the late 1800s, including the $6.6bn acquisition of Pfizer’s consumer healthcare brand in 2006. It holds over 250 subsidiary companies in 57 companies, with William C Weldon at the helm of its board since 2002. More From Our Partners Astounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.com Tags: NULLlast_img read more

Infinity Trust Mortgage Bank Plc (INFINI.ng) Q32018 Interim Report

first_imgInfinity Trust Mortgage Bank Plc (INFINI.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2018 interim results for the third quarter.For more information about Infinity Trust Mortgage Bank Plc (INFINI.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Infinity Trust Mortgage Bank Plc (INFINI.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Infinity Trust Mortgage Bank Plc (INFINI.ng)  2018 interim results for the third quarter.Company ProfileInfinity Trust Mortgage Bank Plc is a mortgage banking institution in Nigeria offering mortgage lending and lines of credit. The company’s head office is in Abuja, Nigeria. Infinity Trust Mortgage Bank Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Championship blog: Round 22 wrap

first_img What it is all about: Below are the latest comings and goings in the ever competitive Championship Elsewhere: sides just playing for prideBedford beat the Cornish Pirates 48-36 in a vastly entertaining 14-try romp at Goldington Road while Nottingham and Moseley’s encounter at Meadow Lane on Saturday produced four tries a-piece, with the Green and Whites winning 29-24. Rotherham 17 Leeds 34It was a case of catching the Bristol ‘yips’ for Carnegie who dominated another possible play-off scenario at Sheffield’s Abbeydale ground on Saturday evening — until the final 10 minutes.The Titans, who have yet to beat a side above them in the division, and don’t look like doing so either, were much more soundly beaten than the score suggests. But two tries from Jamie Broadley in the last four minutes helped to coat a fairly inept performance with a veneer of respectability.In his Leeds days: Titans’ BlackettTo be fair, Rotherham had to call in hooker Johnny Matthews, who normally turns out for National Two club Sedgley Park, and their lineout was a shambles. However, head coach Lee Blackett refused to point the finger saying, “It would be wrong to blame hooker Johnny Matthews because Leeds have the best defending lineout in the league.”Despite the late wobble, Carnegie never looked back from a 0-24 interval lead and are well placed for the knock-out stages.14-man maul drives Trailfinders off the bottomPlymouth 21, Ealing 26A last minute try from a driving maul involving 14 Ealing players allowed Trailfinders to step outside the Last Chance saloon and dare to contemplate a second season of GKIPA Championship rugby.Ed Siggery’s second try, converted by Ben Ward, not only turned a 21-19 deficit into a 21-26 win, but brought up an invaluable bonus point to give his side a two-point cushion.Former Irish flanker SiggeryThen, news from St Peter that London Scottish had defeated Jersey 17-25, denying the hosts a losing bonus-point, made the west Londoners trip home sweeter still.But if Ealing lose to Rotherham, who won 79-9 at Clifton lane in September, and Jersey can beat Bedford at Goldington Road on Saturday, then this will count for nothing, as it will be the Islanders who will stay afloat. There’s an old saying that there are two certainties in life: death and taxes. But now there appears to be a third: that Bristol will implode, come the final quarter of a game they’ve totally dominated.center_img By Richard GraingerBristol brilliance marred by last ten bogeyBristol 25, London Welsh 21The Sky cameras captured a rare smile that lit up Director of Rugby Andy Robinson’s face in the 64th minute, at a packed Memorial Stadium on Friday night, as Ben Mosses dotted down Bristol’s bonus point try, with the Exiles yet to move the scoreboard.But fifteen minutes later, the smile had turned to a scowl as Welsh hit back to finish within five points of the hosts and eclipse an outstanding Bristol performance with some late brilliance of their own. Had this been the first leg of the final, Welsh head coach Justin Burrell would have been happier than Robinson with the outcome.Try-scorer: George Watkins scored against WelshLondon Welsh assistant coach Ollie Smith certainly thought so saying, “When we looked after the ball and got through the phases we scored tries — unfortunately it took us 65 minutes to do that.”One has to question Bristol’s tactics; building a score was always Robinson’s pragmatic hallmark when coaching England and latterly Scotland. To turn down kickable chances against sides in the basement of the division is all very well but surely fallacy against a team with the best defensive record in the league?To emphasise this, Bristol kicked to the corner four times only for Welsh to turn them over on each occasion.Robinson would argue that the tries did come; first before the break when George Watkins crossed on the right flank, then in the second period when Mosses scored a brace and Man of the Match Mitch Eadie finished off Luke Baldwin’s tap-and-go.But when Welsh hit back in the final ten minutes with two tries from Joe Ajuwa and one from Chris Cook, Robinson conceded tactical reversal on two fronts: Nicky Robinson’s shot at goal helped to restore an 11 point lead, and with the tank empty, the bench was called upon to shore up Bristol’s flagging defence.  Fly-half Robinson, who was two from five on the night, is no metronome with the boot, and this could yet cost Bristol an Aviva Premiership place.The Bristol pack was dominant throughout, albeit with some curious interpretations of the scrum laws by referee Luke Pearce.But it was Welsh — who had flanker Richard Thorpe sent off in the 78th minute for repeatedly punching an opponent — who had the last word, both on and off the pitch: “We’ll come out of this knowing that the Memorial Stadium is not a place to fear,” added Smith. He could well be proved right.Leeds looking good for play-offs LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Historian recalls challenges of her call to professional lay ministry

first_imgHistorian recalls challenges of her call to professional lay ministry Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest April 5, 2012 at 2:23 pm To Susan Kreamer….Many thanks for your reminder about the discrepancy of recognition in the church arts! In the Sixties and early Seventies, there was a burst of interest in ecclesiastical stitchery and the design of eucharistic and altar vestments and I knew and rejoiced in the work of a number of women artists. Their work was both aesthetically and theologically exciting. But you’re right…stitchery hasn’t begun to receive the recognition it deserves. And I’m thinking about the work of members of my parish Altar Guild which hasn’t been raised to the level of the art donated by male members! That’s something I can perhaps rectify at least in my own parish. Interesting, how we relegate so much skillful and devoted work to the realm of “women’s work, God bless ’em.” Submit a Press Release Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Women’s Ministry April 5, 2012 at 3:47 pm Martha, My face is red for having mistaken your first name! I’m so sorry.Alda April 4, 2012 at 5:49 pm Dear Alda Morgan,Thank you, thank you. As an ordained woman who served most of her life as a laywoman, I am so aware of the challenges that faced you in following your calling. There are no words to express the gratitude I feel to you and the other pioneers and sustainers of the church.My heart breaks to hear of the loss of your job following women’s ordination. It is my hope and prayer that, ultimately, the ordination of women will result in the elevation of respect and honor awarded the work of those who choose lay service, as a calling, since it is no longer what is left-over that the men won’t do. It especially grieves me to see the contrast between the recognition given male artisans and female ones. Silver, stained glass, and carved wood all are dearly priced and purchased, and the artists named and acclaimed. But the lost art of stitchery, the embroidery and fine handwork done to enhance the altar, with prayers woven into every stitch, were, for the most part, donated to the glory of God by the women who did them. No dedication was held, and their names were not recorded. They remain anonymous. Sadly, their work, being deemed “free” is simply discarded when it becomes worn, or which the colors go out of fashion.Soon, if it is not already gone, that practice will have faded into oblivion, with no one being taught to carry on the craft.Long life and blessings to you! Jeffrey Knox says: Richard Rader says: Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags April 4, 2012 at 9:34 pm Dear Alda,What a treat to read your story, most of which I was unaware of while at CDSP madly pursuing my MDiv and commuting from home where husband and three kids awaited me. I am sorry I didn’t have or make the time to get to know you better then. The unintended consequence of women’s ordination you experienced was both unfair and painful, yet I knew you only as gracious and caring. Thank you for all the gifts you have given the church, and especially for your determination to find a way to offer them when doors closed in your face. Blessings to you. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Martha Kreamer says: April 4, 2012 at 9:59 pm I’d be extraordinarily interested in, and grateful for, anyone’s explanation of what they mean, what they believe, how they know, what they think are the measures of their being “..called..” It is used so very often by someone who is, in most instances, simply moving to another parish, another profession, another…. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Lynn W. Hubewr says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Comments (12) robert maury hundley says: Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Comments are closed. April 5, 2012 at 10:44 am Dear Alda,Thank you so much for all you’ve done to promote women’s ministries in the church. I remember with great fondness working with you at UC Canterbury in 1986. Coming from an academic background (my ex husband was a professor) I always had thought of campus ministry as focusing on students period, but you broadened my view point and I really enjoyed the meetings you shared with faculty, and your real understanding of faculty concerns. You taught me a lot – as much as any priest I encountered on my journey. Submit an Event Listing April 5, 2012 at 1:19 pm Alda, You might have know Dick Cheatham, who was a Dean at Pacific. He resigned as an Army Chaplain when the Chief of Chaplains on behalf of his wife demanded that Dick’s working wife be the hostess for a Chaplain’s wives event. I always thought he was courageous. BTW I rejoice that my seminary classmates at UTS are now ordained, but it appears that some women are now ordained because they are woman (which is Soviet style in which loyal membership in the communist party took the place of seminary preparation, leaving the church w/ no one to challenge the absence of values in the state). Warmest Best Wishes, Under the Lamb, Rev Robert M Hundley Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Jo Wright says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 April 4, 2012 at 8:22 pm Excellent points, Martha Kreamer. Fascinating story, Sharon about a most worthy subject, Alda Marsh Morgan, who had and has much to say to the church. I have great respect for clergy, male and female, but would like to think that laypeople’s gifts are on an equal footing. Submit a Job Listingcenter_img Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA By Sharon SheridanPosted Apr 4, 2012 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York [Episcopal News Service] This is one of a series of articles by ENS examining women’s history in the church.Alda Marsh Morgan says women’s ordination has been a mixed blessing for the role of women in the Episcopal Church. Photo/Alda Marsh MorganIn the church, discussions of “call” often center on ordination. But Alda Marsh Morgan of Berkeley, California, followed a call to professional lay ministry – a call that, ironically, was disrupted when women’s ordination became possible in the Episcopal Church.Born in 1939 in Dayton, Ohio, Morgan grew up in a Baptist parsonage but became an Episcopalian while attending Oberlin College (http://new.oberlin.edu/). After graduating, she entered the Episcopal Church’s Apprenticeship Program, “which provided women a year of internship in various ministries to test a vocation as a lay woman church worker,” Morgan said in an ENS interview conducted via e-mail. “Although my internship was in a social-work agency, I already knew that I wanted to be a campus minister.”She next entered St. Margaret’s House in Berkeley, one of a handful of schools that trained Episcopal deaconesses. Deaconesses were officially recognized as an order of women in the Episcopal Church “set apart” for servant ministry but not as ordained deacons, Morgan explained, adding that she was uninterested in becoming a deaconess. She earned a master’s degree in Christian education and accepted a position at what now is West Chester State University, southwest of Philadelphia, to begin a ministry based at Holy Trinity Episcopal Church. “My supervisor was the diocesan director of campus ministry, but I was considered part of the parish staff.”At her supervisor’s encouragement, she organized an ecumenical ministry sponsored by six local congregations – Baptist, Episcopal, Lutheran, two Presbyterian, and United Church of Christ. “Those six years were immensely satisfying, as I got there just as the college was beginning to broaden its formerly educational programs to liberal arts. The ’60s were a time of great change and stir, and Bishop [Robert] DeWitt’s leadership on the diocesan level was exhilarating. I was part of his ‘cadre’ of supporters and colleagues, and it seemed as if a new sun was rising and everything was a possibility.”But that same leadership helped precipitate a “severe shortfall of diocesan funding” that led her to leave. “His strong support for civil rights and other liberal causes raised a lot of opposition in what was then a conservative diocese,” she said.“I had left because my work with the local churches in a small county seat raised questions for me about the relationship between American Protestantism and higher education, so I went back to Berkeley for a doctorate in history. … I looked upon my graduate work as professional continuing education.”She entered the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, becoming involved both in campus ministries and at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, and seriously considered the possibility of ordination. “We talk about ‘discernment’ now, and my decision was that I wasn’t called to the ordained ministry, but … did have a calling to ministry as a lay woman.”While she was a college student and afterward, she said, “there was a robust community of professional women church workers, supported by the church, although not widely understood at the grassroot levels.”“Most of us were in Christian education, but many of us were in social work (for church related agencies) and campus ministry. Many women, like myself, had begun campus ministries, later relinquishing them to clergy. My thinking then was that it was a tossup as to which was the bigger obstacle for me and other women workers – being a woman or being a lay person. After the ordination of women was passed [by the General Convention in 1976], I learned the answer: It was being a lay professional in a clerical church.“What happened, with startling speed, was that most of us lost our jobs. Much of the work that women workers had done depended on the need for ministries in areas that male clergy either wouldn’t touch or where they cost more than the women. My supervisor had told me up front that he looked for a woman for West Chester because he couldn’t afford to pay a clergyman. … But the bottom line for me after 1976 was that the vocation to which I was passionately committed – campus ministry – was no longer available to me. The last position I applied to was at Northwestern and, notwithstanding my education and experience, I was told I was out of the running because I wasn’t a priest. Ironically, the job went to a woman priest, a friend and a damned good minister.”“Subsequently, I made work for myself in campus ministry—as the volunteer provincial coordinator of ministry in higher education for Province VIII and then, in a program I designed … LEAVEN, a three-year ministry development program with faculty and staff at [the University of California]. While working in LEAVEN, I was asked to consult nationwide by colleagues who wanted help with their faculty/staff ministries. But it wasn’t until I was hired as the interim director of continuing education at [Church Divinity School of the Pacific] in 1989 that I again held a paid position working for the church. I worked in that department under three deans until 2003, when I took early retirement. Theological education became my new ‘vocation,’ but I never lost my yearning for and commitment to campus ministry. It took years to recover from the anger and resentment I felt once I realized that I was, in effect, barred from that work.”Morgan married Donn Morgan, who became CDSP’s dean and president, in 1975 and received her doctoral degree in 1984. “My own field is American religious and intellectual history with a specialty in higher education and its relationships with the churches,” she said. Her work has included research and writing about women church workers. “I think it’s a great story, and I am so pleased that in recent years the women seminarians at CDSP and women elsewhere are beginning to broaden their interest in their past to include the women missionaries, the sisters, deaconesses and church workers as their foremothers.”She sees the advances women have made in leadership roles in the church – from governance to ordination – as “positive for the church’s mission in many ways and way, way overdue.”“On the other hand,” she said, “the possibility of ordination has closed the ranks for lay women who wish to serve the church professionally.”“Finally, oddly, when women had to work through segregated organizations – the Women’s Auxiliary, the Order of Deaconesses, the Division of Women’s Work – we had a spirit and a sense of mutual community and support that we seem to lack now.” While not looking to return to the past, she said, “I grow a little wistful about the loss of esprit that we once had.”Through the years, she has served the church at all levels, including as a member of the Standing Commission on Ecumenical Relations and as a representative to the National Council of Churches General Assembly. “In all these various forms of service and ministry,” she concluded, “I suspect that my advocacy of the importance of education is the connecting link – even when it isn’t obvious.”Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Alda Morgan says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Freda Marie says: Solange De Santis says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ April 6, 2012 at 1:28 pm Thanks for your story, Alda. I was pleased to see it on ENS post today, and send cheers and blessings to both you and Donn. – Jon Davidson, Lake Tahoe Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Jon Davidson says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Alda Morgan says: April 6, 2012 at 11:32 am @ Alda: Thank you for your SERVICE…you have obviously been doing this work in the name of Our [email protected]: Thank you for your insight…Amen to your words. April 5, 2012 at 8:56 am What a wonderful story for us to read for Holy Week. Without the laity steadfast determination, and dedication to keep the Ministry going, even when resources are cut, and the game plan gets changed. In Christ we are neither male or female…but all are ONE! A 70 year old cradle Episcopalian still discovering this ONENESS! Margaret Irwin says: Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group April 5, 2012 at 2:34 pm I am very interested in this!First, as a spiritual director, it has been my experience that often when people get really excited about their faith, others become uncomfortable, and ask them, “Have you thought about going to seminary/becoming clergy?” If our baptism is a call to 24/7/365 ministry, then whether we are paid by the church or not, we are all “called.”I’ve been a paid, full-time diocesan staff person, a licensed preacher in three dioceses, a secularly-employed social worker and professor of social work, a volunteer spiritual director, a paid teacher of spiritual direction (part time), a volunteer prison minister, a paid retreat leader, a gardener, a friend, a hiker, a wife … all are part of my living out my ‘call.’Sometimes when folks ask me if I ever thought of ordination, I say that I feel called to be an ‘iconic lay person’, helping others to see that their baptism IS a call to full-time ministry.I have a bunch of friends who are priests, almost all of whom I knew well before their ordinations. They tell me that ordination often makes them lose friends. And clericalism surely survives well in spite of the “new” prayer book’s listing of the ministers as “lay persons, (note this is first), bishops, priests and deacons). It’s very hard to move large systems. But Alda’s contribution to the conversation is welcome and very helpful, and perhaps may help us to be more aware and to move a bit. I am grateful to have ‘met’ her in this story.Blessings on all of us, and on this hurting world, as we live out Holy Week together,Lynn W. Huber Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL last_img read more

Mission agency-backed craft business in Tanzania shifts production to masks…

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Posted May 15, 2020 COVID-19, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Anglican Communion News Service] A small business staffed by men and women with disabilities making craft items in Tanzania has halted its normal production process and is now turning out personal protective equipment (PPE) for the country’s medical workers. Neema Crafts, pioneered and led by the Church Mission Society, made the switch in January and is now manufacturing PPE for Tanzania’s hospitals, medical centers and key front-line workers.They workers are now producing 800 masks, 120 face shields and 50 gowns per week, from the safety of their own homes. With no national health service in Tanzania, the aim is to protect the lives of front-line workers against COVID-19 and to support the livelihoods of people with disabilities in the Iringa region as they work from home, CMS said.“We are proud of how the team at Neema Crafts have risen to the challenge of producing PPE,” CMS mission partners Ben and Katy Ray, the directors of Neema Crafts, said. “It will ensure our disabled artisans continue to receive an income and it could mean the difference between life and death for hospital workers in our region.” Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Mission agency-backed craft business in Tanzania shifts production to masks and face shields Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Health & Healthcare center_img Anglican Communion, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Africa, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI last_img read more

One World Broadcasting Awards

first_imgOne World Broadcasting Awards Howard Lake | 11 January 2002 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  11 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. The One World Broadcasting Awards recognise excellence in the communication of sustainable development and human rights.The One World Broadcasting Awards recognise excellence in the communication of sustainable development and human rights. The closing date for entries for this year’s awards is 22 March 2002.Find out more from EnvironmentAwards.net. Advertisementlast_img read more

Lloyds TSB Foundation’s income increases by 10%

first_img Howard Lake | 19 April 2006 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. The Lloyds TSB Foundation for England and Wales has announced its income for 2006 as £24.8 million, up from £22.5 million in 2004.The Lloyds TSB Foundations make up one of the largest grant-making trusts in the UK and support charities that enable people, especially those who are disadvantaged or disabled, to play a fuller role in the community. The Foundations’ focus is on funding social and community projects as well as education and training initiatives. Since 1987, when the Foundations were formed, they have made grants totalling over £275 million.In 2006, the four independent Lloyds TSB Foundations in the UK will have a total of £34.45m available to make grants to charities. England and Wales will receive £24.8m and Scotland £6.7m; Northern Ireland will receive £1.8m and the Channel Islands will benefit from £1.1m. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img Lloyds TSB Foundation’s income increases by 10%  18 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

Men’s golf finishes sixth in opening tournament

first_imgCole Polleyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cole-polley/ ReddIt Cole Polleyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cole-polley/ Cole Polley SGA supports addition of new minor Robert Carr Chapel holds Election Day service Linkedin City proposes price increase for golf yearly passes SGA brings ‘It’s On Us’ to campus in joint Big 12 initiative + posts Facebook Facebook ReddIt Previous articleThree male students assaulted FridayNext articleESPN Game Day Coverage Cole Polley RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Cole Polleyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cole-polley/ printThe TCU men’s golf team teed off its season this weekend at the Carmel Cup at Pebble Beach Golf Links in California, the site of five U.S. Open Championships. The Frogs finished sixth out of eight teams in the tournament.Despite finishing sixth, the team managed to climb over two opponents in the final day of competition.The Frogs posted a 1106 team score for the tournament. Oklahoma State took home first prize in the event with a 1075, followed by No. 12 ranked Georgia (1081) and No. 11 ranked Vanderbilt (1082).Senior Paul Barjon stood out among the Frogs, finishing 10th individually. Barjon shot 217 for the tournament, shooting 1-under-par 71’s in the first two rounds before shooting a 3-over-par 75 on Sunday to finish 1 over for the tournament. It was his seventh career Top 10 finish.Barjon was closely followed by a 4-over-par total from junior Chelso Barrett and a 5-over-par total from freshman Pierre Mazier, who was competing in his first collegiate tournament.TCU Final Individual ResultsT10. Paul Barjon- 217 (+1)T23. Chelso Barrett- 220 (+4)T27. Pierre Mazier- 221 (+5)T37. Sarosh Adi- 226 (+10)39. Giulio Castagnara – 227 (+11)T45. Turner MacLean- 233 (+17)The team will tee up again on September 25 and 26 in Albequerque, N.M., for the William H. Tucker Intercollegiate tournament. Cole Polleyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cole-polley/ Cole is a Sophomore Journalism major from Llano, Texas. He’s an avid Seinfeld watcher and he is passionate about the San Antonio Spurs, listening to Drake & chicken wings. Hit him up on Twitter @CPolley12! Twitter Linkedin Twitter SGA holds Outreach Day to interact with students Taylor’s monster slam highlights big weekend for TCU Athletics TCU golf weekend roundup Men’s Golf poses for a team photo at the Carmel Cup at Pebble Beach Golf Links in Pebble Beach, Calif.last_img read more

Charlie Rahilly Joins Ed Bacon in the Rector’s Forum

first_imgFaith & Religion News Charlie Rahilly Joins Ed Bacon in the Rector’s Forum On Sunday, May 4 at 11:15 a.m. From STAFF REPORTS Published on Thursday, May 1, 2014 | 6:02 pm Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Top of the News Community News Subscribe 3 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS HerbeautyNutritional Strategies To Ease AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyTop 9 Predicted Haircut Trends Of 2020HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyEverything You Need To Know About This Two-Hour ProcedureHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNerdy Movie Kids Who Look Unrecognizable TodayHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou’ll Want To Get Married Twice Or Even More Just To Put Them OnHerbeautyHerbeauty First Heatwave Expected Next Week center_img Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. More Cool Stuff Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Make a comment Business News Join All Saints Church as Ed Bacon and Charlie Rahilly unpack the influential work of economist Thomas Piketty in a multi-media Rector’s Forum: Wealth and Inequality in America: Connecting the Economic Justice Dots. Can’t join us in person? Watch the video of the Rector’s Forum and the entire 11:15 a.m. service streaming live here.Charlie Rahilly is the President of Premiere Radio Networks Inc., a subsidiary of Clear Channel Communications that syndicates 90 radio programs and services to more than 5,000 radio affiliates, reaching more than 190 million listeners weekly. He oversees all aspects of company operations, directing and supervising all talk and music programming and services, featuring Rush Limbaugh, Jim Rome, Casey Kasem, Ryan Seacrest, Steve Harvey and other personalities. Before assuming his current position in 2007, he was executive vice president of operations at Clear Channel Radio, where he oversaw Central Region Radio Operations. Rahilly began his career in radio in 1987 as controller at KFAC-FM in Los Angeles; he moved on in 1990 to become an account executive at Clear Channel’s 102.7 KIIS-FM, taking on various management roles at the station and then within the company′s Los Angeles cluster.All Saints Church, 132 N. Euclid Avenue, Pasadena, (626) 796-1172 or visit www.allsaints-pas.org. Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

River Foyle dolphin in Strabane dies

first_img LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By News Highland – July 24, 2014 Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week Pinterest Google+ Previous articleJury in trial of John Brown to resume deliberations this morningNext articleDerry need to score to stay in Europa League News Highland WhatsApp A dolphin which was spotted in the Foyle on Sunday last has died.Earlier in the week, large crowds came out in the vicinity of the Bog Road to see the dolphin, who was nicknamed “Flipper” by some local people.However, it became clear on Tuesday evening that something was wrong, and yesterday it was confirmed the dolphin was dead.It was initially spotted by Danny Hunter, who runs local fishery Woodside Angling.He says the dolphin was failed by the statutory authorities, who should have done more to prevent it…….Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/danythur.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Facebook Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Google+center_img Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published WhatsApp Pinterest Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson Twitter River Foyle dolphin in Strabane dies Twitter Facebook News Business Matters Ep 45 – Boyd Robinson, Annette Houston & Michael Margeylast_img read more