Life in the Lion City

first_imgA world leader in research and innovation, Singapore might be a small country but it still knows how to score big when it comes to its higher education system. It has been ranked first in the Innovation and Information Technology Foundation’s 2011 report and second in the World Economic Forum’s,A world leader in research and innovation, Singapore might be a small country but it still knows how to score big when it comes to its higher education system. It has been ranked first in the Innovation and Information Technology Foundation’s 2011 report and second in the World Economic Forum’s Global Competitiveness Report in 2012. The country’s two main universities, the National University of Singapore and Nanyang Technological University are amongst the top 50 academic institutes in the world.In the last few years the country has also seen a number of new universities and institutions coming up. Some of these include the Singapore University of Technology and Design, the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine at NTU and SIM University. A number of private universities and branches of foreign universities have also opened a campus in Singapore such as India’s Management Development Institute, University of Adelaide, James Cook University, City University of New York, Chicago Business School, University of Wales Institute and NYU Tisch School of Arts.”After reading up on various universities around the world, I realised that competition was much less in Singapore for the same standard of education. Additionally it’s relatively easier to obtain student visas in Singapore and although the cost of living might be high, there’re a lot of grants and financial assistance available for foreign students,” says Rimi Basu, 25, a graduate from Singapore. Interestingly Singapore’s Ministry of Education has revealed that it has given international students tuition grants of nearly $210 million per year. “There are a lot of discounts, deals and packages that are made available for students throughout the year. Additionally since it’s a cosmopolitan country, you get to feel right at home,” adds Basu.For many students it is also the recreational and nightlife options that make Singapore an attractive destination. From night safaris to island resorts, adventure sports, clubs and shopping high streets, there’s something for everyone to enjoy here. “As far as lifestyle options go there’s an incredible variety both in terms of prices as well as themes. However, what really sets the country apart is its safety aspect. Crime against students here is very rare,” says Malini Chopra, 23, a chartered accountant graduate from Singapore.advertisementWhether it’s financial assistance, safety, quality of education or a high standard of living, the Lion City certainly knows how to look after its thriving student community.last_img read more

Festival of Dance and Music enthralls connoisseurs

first_imgThe Parampara Series, which is conducted right after the soothing monsoon and just before the withering autumn, has stood firm for the last 18 years and is now synonymous with Delhi’s annual cultural scene. Over time Parampara has blended concerts by presenting classical geniuses under creative themes giving uniquely fresh approach to otherwise traditional arts forms.This year Natya Tarangini presented Parampara Series from September 25 to 27 which was performed from 7 pm to 10 pm at Kamani Auditorium.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The festivals represented some of the most successful dance productions of recent times in addition to musical concerts by legendary artists.  As always the Parampara Series showcased two concerts every evening (Dance and Music).On day one, Dr Raja Radha Reddy and his group performed the Kuchipudi Ballet titled Mahanatyam and Pt. Sanjeev Abhayankar hit the soul of the audience through his music and provided a soothing experience for the listeners.Dr Raja Radha Reddy and Kaushalya Reddy’s efforts are always to bring new concerts and themes while promoting traditional art forms.last_img read more