a month agoChelsea boss Lampard slams FIFA for ‘wrong, strange’ Leeds choice

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Chelsea boss Lampard slams FIFA for ‘wrong, strange’ Leeds choiceby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea manager Frank Lampard has slammed FIFA’s decision to award Marcelo Bielsa and Leeds United their Fair Play award on Monday.Bielsa and his players were awarded the Fair Play Award for allowing Aston Villa to score against them in April.Renowned coach Bielsa, currently in his second season at Leeds and in English football, caused something of a stir in January when he admitted to having watched all of United’s opponents train.The club was fined £200,000 as a result – a penalty Bielsa paid out of his own pocket – and the 64-year-old was the subject of some derision as a result.Lampard, in charge of Derby last season, said: “I don’t think it’s right, to be straight.“It’s strange. Everyone had the same reaction. There was a lot of news about “SpyGate,” at the time, quite rightly so, and it got dealt with in the right way – and when you go and give an award for fair play in the same year, it’s strange.“I don’t know who votes for it. Everyone knows what happened with ‘Spygate’ – it is well documented. The rules changed because of it and they were fined.“I felt it was improper, to get a fair play award off the back of that. I thought it was irony at first.“It was a dead rubber against Villa. The game had slowed down to the point of the ball going out, and it was quite right they gave Villa the opportunity to score.“It was quite right to level out the balance of what had happened. That was that. But it was a strange decision for them to win.” last_img read more

The Museum of Drug Policy Fortyone art pieces highlighting the impact of

first_imgMont-Royal Centre2200 Mansfield St., Montréal (Québec)  H3A 3R8 Login/Register With: The Museum will be open to the public on May 15-17, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Advertisement Facebook Museum of Drug Policy’s international travelling exhibit, in a “pop-up museum” format  LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment WHO: WHAT: This ephemeral cultural hub supported by Open Society Foundations was launched last year during the UN General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) on Drugs. The Museum offers a powerful, emotional experience that illustrates the harms caused by current prohibitionist drug policies and advocates for new approaches rooted in dignity, health, and human rights.“This exhibit calls attention to the health and human impact of drug policy in ways that research studies and PowerPoint presentations cannot,” said Daniel Wolfe, Director of International Harm Reduction Development at the Open Society Foundations. “The artists whose work is displayed here remind us that scientific evidence is not enough, and that we must also open other channels to inspire commitment to make change in how we treat drugs and those who use them.”The Museum of Drug Policy will showcase artwork by contemporary artists, including Tracy Hetzel, watercolor illustrator of the “The Execution Series” portraits, which presents five individuals who have been executed after being convicted of drug offenses, as well as two portraits from the series “At last… rest” that Zefrey Throwell has created from the ashes of his deceased father, Douglas Throwell, which still contain traces of methamphetamine, thereby representing a deeply personal memorial, as well as an account of this drug’s lethal effects.Ann Lewis, a multidisciplinary activist artist also known as Gilf!, will exhibit a unique participatory art piece on the victims of Canada’s ongoing opioid crisis. “Through their powerful pieces, artists like Ann Lewis put a sharp focus on realities that would otherwise go unnoticed, as they are hard to visualize and absorb using statistics,” said Michael Skolnik, CEO of The Soze Agency, the design firm behind the Museum of Drug Policy. “The idea of exhibiting art pieces in a ‘pop-up museum’ also reflects Open Society Foundations premise that solutions to these complex issues must be sought through innovative approaches, by thinking outside of the box.”Art pieces by Québec artists who contributed to L’Injecteur, published by the Association québécoise pour la promotion de la santé des personnes utilisatrices de drogues, will also be on display.This free event, open to the public on May 15-17 from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., will take visitors around the world, inciting them to think and act differently. The exhibit will be presented at the Mont-Royal Centre, at 2200 Mansfield St., Montréal.About the Open Society FoundationsThe Open Society Foundations work to build vibrant and tolerant societies whose governments are accountable to their citizens. Working with local communities in more than 100 countries, the Open Society Foundations support justice and human rights, freedom of expression, and access to public health and education. www.opensocietyfoundations.org / museumofdrugpolicy.org WHERE: Over 20 local and international artists exhibiting 41 art pieces MONTRÉAL – Following its successful launch in New York in April 2016, the Museum of Drug Policy’s international travelling exhibit will be making its first stop in Montréal in a “pop-up museum” format on May 15-17, as part of the 25thHarm Reduction International Conference, before making its way to Europe. Visitors will get an opportunity to view forty-one various art pieces from local and international artists that show how drug policies affect our friends, families and communities. Advertisement Advertisement WHEN: Twitterlast_img read more

Under fire Morneau to sell 21M worth of shares put assets in

first_imgOTTAWA – Finance Minister Bill Morneau, under siege from relentless opposition attacks over how he handled his personal fortune when he entered government in 2015, went on the offensive Thursday with a promise to sell off tens of millions of dollars worth of shares in the family business that bears his name.At least $21 million in Morneau Shepell shares held by Morneau and his family will be sold off, while the rest of his assets will be placed into a blind trust, the minister said as he sought to snuff out conflict of interest allegations threatening to undermine the federal Liberal government.All the while, the wealthy former businessman continued to insist he disclosed all his assets to the federal ethics watchdog when he came into office two years ago, and that he that he followed her recommendations very carefully to avoid any conflicts of interest.That, the embattled Morneau has now decided, wasn’t good enough.“I perhaps naively thought that in Canada following the rules and respecting the recommendations of the ethics commissioner … would be what Canadians would expect,” Morneau told a news conference. “In fact, what I have seen over the last week is that I need to do more.”Morneau said he currently owns about a million shares — $21 million worth at current stock prices — in the human resources and pension management firm he and his family helped to build. Public filings show that in March, Morneau’s father, William Morneau Sr., held just over 200,000 shares, worth about $4.2 million.Morneau didn’t, however, mention the dividends those shares generate: 6.5 cents a share, equating to roughly $65,000 a month.When asked why he changed his mind, Morneau admitted the issue has become a major distraction and was taking away from what he characterized as his important work as Liberal finance minister — work he wants to continue doing.“I’m going to go farther, above and beyond anything that might have been recommended because I want to make sure that this isn’t the discussion that we’re having tomorrow or the day after,” he said.“I am trying to make sure that we are successfully improving the lives of Canadians across the country, so if we’re getting distracted because some people are worried about my personal situation, it’s time to move on. And that’s what I’ve decided to do.”Morneau said until his shares are divested they will remain behind a conflict-of-interest screen, which has been overseen by the minister’s chief of staff, to ensure he abstains from any discussions or decisions that could benefit his personal interests.He said he could recall at least two instances where he was removed from meetings because of the screen.Thursday’s decision — aimed at silencing Morneau’s increasingly vocal critics — could also be considered a tacit acknowledgment that the rules themselves are in need of an update, something the ethics commissioner herself has suggested in the past.Commissioner Mary Dawson revealed this week that she told Morneau a blind trust wouldn’t be necessary, since his shares were indirectly held through private companies and were therefore not considered a “controlled asset” under the Conflict of Interest Act.However, Dawson urged the previous Conservative government in 2013 to amend the law to require blind trusts for personal assets owned by public office holders, regardless of whether they were directly or indirectly owned — a change that was never made.Morneau, who stepped down as Morneau Shepell’s executive chairman shortly after the election, said Thursday that when he first entered cabinet, he fully expected he would have to put his assets in a blind trust, as did the company he was leaving behind. However, Dawson told him it wouldn’t be necessary, he said.At that time, public filings showed Morneau owned 2,254,109 shares, most of them through an Alberta numbered company. On Thursday, he said it was only about a million shares, although he didn’t elaborate on what happened to the rest.All week long, the Conservatives and New Democrats have accused the government of being in a conflict of interest created by a finance minister regulating an industry that includes a company in which he owns significant shares.NDP MP Nathan Cullen has called on Dawson to investigate Morneau for spearheading pension reform legislation that could benefit Morneau Shepell and, through shares he still holds, the minister himself.In the days after Morneau personally introduced that bill, the value of Morneau Shepell shares rose 4.8 per cent, Cullen said during question period, Morneau’s first this week since the controversy exploded. The minister shrugged off Cullen, noting Dawson had already signed off on the arrangement.The opposition charges have all but drowned out the government’s efforts to address another, earlier controversy over its widely panned changes to small business taxes.“Of course, there’s been a distraction this week,” Morneau said earlier in the day during a news conference at a farm in the Ontario community of Erinsville, where he was trying to deliver good news: that the government would not proceed with a tax change that has angered farmers.He said Ottawa will reconsider the proposal related to the conversion of income into capital gains after hearing concerns from farmers and fishers. The proposal raised fears about how it could hinder the intergenerational transfer of family business, like farms.It had been one of the three key components of the government’s package of tax proposals.Morneau’s first to the House of Commons on Thursday after spending the week making announcements to scale back some of the so-called tax reforms, which have angered small business owners, doctors, farmers and even Liberal backbench MPs.Earlier this week, the government also ditched another proposed measure that would have had a negative impact on the transfer of family businesses from one generation to the next.Morneau also announced this week that he will scale back a proposal to crack down on passive investment income, which was one of the most contentious elements of his plan.Follow @AndyBlatchford on Twitterlast_img read more

Aimia reviewing strategic direction reports 217M thirdquarter profit

first_imgCompanies in this story: (TSX:AIM, TSX:AC, TSX:TD, TSX:CM)The Canadian Press MONTREAL — Aimia Inc. says it has launched a review of its future strategic direction as it works to complete the sale of its Aeroplan program.The loyalty rewards company says the board of directors has asked management to present it with alternative visions and plans regarding the company’s future after the sale of Aeroplan.The review came as Aimia reported it earned $21.7 million or 11 cents per share in its third quarter, compared with a loss of $40.3 million or 29 cents per share in the same period last yearRevenue totalled $372.7 million for the quarter ended Sept. 30, up from $350.5 million in the third quarter of 2017.Aimia signed a $450-million deal in August to sell the Aeroplan loyalty program to an Air Canada-led group, which includes TD Bank, CIBC and Visa Canada Corp.The future of Aeroplan had faced questions after Air Canada rolled out plans to start its own loyalty rewards program in 2020 after its partnership with Aimia expired.last_img read more

Spicy Thai Basil Chicken

first_imgIngredients Chicken Broth 1/3 cup Oyster Sauce 1 tbsp Soy Sauce 1 tbsp Fish Sauce 2 tsp White Sugar 1 tsp Brown Sugar 1 tsp Vegetable Oil 2 tbsp Chicken Thighs (boneless) 1 pound Sliced Shallots 1/4 cup Garlic (minced) 4 cloves Also Read – PUMPKIN MASH, TAMATAR RASSAThai Chilies (minced) 2 tbsp Fresh Basil Leaves 1 cup Cooked Rice (hot) 2 cup Preparation Whisk chicken broth, oyster sauce, soy sauce, fish sauce, white sugar and brown sugar together in a bowl until well blended. Heat large skillet over high heat. Drizzle in oil. Add chicken and stir fry until it loses its raw colour, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in shallots, garlic and sliced chilies. Continue cooking on high heat until some of the juices start to caramelize in the bottom of the pan, about 2 or 3 more minutes. Add about a tablespoon of the sauce mixture to the skillet; cook and stir until sauce begins to caramelize, about 1 minute. Pour in the rest of the sauce. Cook and stir until sauce has deglazed the bottom of the pan. Continue to cook until sauce glazes onto the meat, 1 or 2 more minutes. Remove from heat. Stir in basil. Cook and stir until basil is wilted, about 20 seconds. Serve with rice. (Courtesy: www.allrecipes.com)last_img read more

Heat relief mission State introduces AC tram for daily passengers

first_imgKolkata: The state Transport department has introduced an air conditioned tram for daily passengers in the city.Till now, the air conditioned trams were only used on special occasions such as birthdays of dignitaries and celebration of events. Such trams were hired for some time with a designated charge on hourly basis. “At present, we have only four AC trams in our fleet and we have introduced one of them for daily commuters. It is aimed at providing relief to passengers in the summer months,” a senior official of West Bengal Trasnport Corporation (WBTC) said. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaThe AC tram, which is plying from the end of April, has a fare of Rs 20 per head. At present, the tram is plying in Shyambazar-Esplanade and Nonapukur-Esplanade routes. The tram having a single bogey is perfectly suited for city roads, which is congested due to heavy traffic. In fact a number of tram routes in the city have been affected due to metro project work. The service of the tram is available from 10 am to 7 pm daily. “We are getting a good response and after monitoring the number of passengers for some months. We may roll out one or two more AC trams in future,” the official added. The seating capacity of the tram is 28. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayThe two special AC trams — Banalata and Charuibeti — that are being used for joyrides particularly during weekends have basic kitchen facilities for making tea, coffee and serving hot snacks. But, the AC tram for daily commuters will not have such facilities. The AC buses have contributed reasonably in boosting the exchequer of the state Transport department particularly during the summer months. “We are hopeful that the AC tram also will also be a hit,” the official said.last_img read more