Anthony Joshua says promoter Eddie Hearn speaking to Tyson Fury about fight

first_imgBritain’s Anthony Joshua believes a fight with former world champion Tyson Fury is a possibility, saying promoter Eddie Hearn has begun discussions about it.Joshua retained his IBF, WBA and IBO world heavyweight titles with a 10th-round stoppage-win over Carlos Takam in Cardiff on Saturday.The 28-year-old said he was keen on fighting fellow Briton Fury, whose licence was suspended by the British Boxing Board of Control after he relinquished his two world titles last year to focus on overcoming his mental health problems.”It’s Anthony Joshua versus the world right now, I have got to fight them all,” he told Sky Sports.”Eddie is right, as a promoter it works well for him, it works well for me and I think it works well for people who want to watch me and Fury get it on.”I wish him the best of luck with what he’s going through because we need to see him back in the ring. Eddie has been on the phone to Tyson, trying to make things happen and support his cause.”Fury, who has a 25-0 record, was also charged with a rule violation by UK Anti-Doping after a urine sample from February, 2015 showed traces of the banned stimulant nandrolone. He has denied any wrongdoing.Joshua understands he must also fulfil his obligations with regard to mandatory fights as a champion against opponents including New Zealand’s Joseph Parker and American Deontay Wilder.”At the minute, the fighters who are closer on a championship level are the likes of Parker and Wilder,” Joshua added.advertisementlast_img read more

Dont Give the Stanley Cup to the Kings Just Yet

If you read the North American sports media — Sportsnet, CBC, THN, USA Today, CBS, ESPN — you’ve heard that Henrik Lundqvist may as well go on vacation; this year’s Stanley Cup already belongs to the Los Angeles Kings. My quick scan showed 12 of 14 hockey media types picking the Kings to beat the New York Rangers in the NHL playoffs’ final round, which begin on Wednesday, and it’s easy to see why. The Kings have a recent track record of success (a Cup in 2012 and a conference finals appearance in 2013). They come from the stronger conference — the West won 246 games and lost 202 against the East this year — and to get to the finals they had to beat teams that had 111, 116 and 107 points this season. Quite different from the Rangers’ playoff run, which included struggles to beat flawed teams and scrapping against backup goaltenders.Except it isn’t that simple, and not just because hockey is a sport disproportionately fueled by luck. The Rangers have a case to make — even on paper. The stats give them a real shot.Let’s start with shooting percentage, where the teams are evenly matched. Both New York and LA struggled this year: The Rangers’ 6.7 percent at 5-on-5 ranked 28th in the league and the Kings’ 6.6 percent was 29th. That’s not a big enough gap to make a difference, because shooting (and save percentages) in hockey are prone to large fluctuations. Given that the teams took about 2,000 shots, that 0.1 percentage point difference represents just two goals, and it’s easy to see how some random bounces could explain it.That’s not to say that shooting percentage is completely meaningless. Pulling our estimates of a team’s shooting skill two-thirds of the way towards the mean helps account for the impact of random chance. If the Rangers and Kings had huge differences that might tell us something about their differing skill. But they only had a margin of 0.1 percentage points this year and 0.8 over the last three years. Between the change in personnel and systems over time and the limitations of multiyear analysis, the Kings and Rangers are close enough that it’s hard to be confident that either team has an edge in shooting percentage.But there are differences to be found among the less top-level stats. Much of today’s advanced stat analysis begins with studying teams’ shot differential as an indicator of their ability to control play. In this regard, the Kings do have a clear edge; indeed, over the last few years they’ve been the best puck-possession team in the league.The Kings outshot their opponents 57 percent to 43 percent during 5-on-5 play this year,1In this piece, “shots” will be taken to include both shots on goal and shots that miss the net, the measure proposed by Matt Fenwick. excluding situations where the score was close enough that teams sat back to protect a lead.2Focusing on situations where the score is close was first popularized by hockey stat pioneer Tore Purdy, more commonly known as JLikens. Purdy recently died at the age of only 28, a tragic loss. He wrote the piece about estimating team shooting talent that I linked above. He’ll be missed. They led the NHL, but the Rangers weren’t too far behind, outshooting their opponents 54 percent to 46 percent. From these two figures, we might expect the Kings to get something like 51.5 percent of the shots against the Rangers; when we include the somewhat tougher opponents they faced this year, we might revise our estimate upwards a bit to something closer to 52 percent.3The Kings’ average opponent got 49.91 percent of the shots, just a little bit higher than the Rangers’ average opponent (49.77 percent). That simple 0.14 point difference probably underestimates the competition — just as the Kings’ shot differential underrates them by not factoring in the strength of the opponents they faced, this metric also underrates their opponents slightly for the same reason. Since there are lots of things we can’t account for (specific matchups, who’s currently nursing an injury, etc.), our projected matchup can never be accurate to three decimal places. I’ve been rounding these figures off in most places, which means that we don’t need to plow through the arithmetic of exactly how much of an effect it has; the Kings’ likely share of shots against the Rangers will round to 52 percent in the end.But that was the regular season, and it’s worth testing whether anything has changed in the playoffs. That means looking at a smaller sample of data — 20 games instead of 82 — which makes it important not to let any stat go to waste. So instead of outright excluding the lead-protecting situations from our analysis (the common way of doing it), let’s include them and correct for the impact of score effects.4To do that, I used a methodology I developed a couple of years ago. It’s a small but important difference, especially when dealing with a sample size this small.By this method, the Kings’ adjusted shot differential in the playoffs was about 52 percent to 48 percent, very similar to the Rangers’ 51-49. However, the Kings were dominant against much tougher competition; they held their opponents about 5 points below those teams’ season averages, whereas the Rangers held their opponents just a fraction of a point below theirs. Once we correct for that, we again end up estimating that the Kings will get about 52 percent of the shots over the series, or maybe as high as 53 percent. That represents a clear edge, if not an overwhelming one.So far, so Kings. But there’s also special teams play to take into account. The Rangers drew 32 more penalties than they took in the regular season, whereas the Kings took 12 more penalties than they drew. The Rangers had a higher power play conversion percentage and a better penalty kill percentage,5They also had better shot rates in both situations, which is an important component of predicting future performance. so we should expect the them to have more and better power plays than the Kings in the long run — even if the actual results of this short series will be dominated by random chance.Finally, it’s possible that it’s all going to come down to goaltending — this is hockey, after all — and the Rangers have a clear advantage there. This was the fifth straight year that Henrik Lundqvist posted a save percentage higher than 92 percent, and his save percentage has been higher than Jonathan Quick’s in every year of Quick’s career. Obviously, over a short series either goalie can get hot and turn the tide, but goalie streaks are almost entirely unpredictable and all we can do in advance is note which goalie is more talented. In this case, it’s clearly Lundqvist. The question is just how big of an advantage he gives the Rangers.In other words, Lundqvist is the fulcrum. If we expect the Kings to get 52 to 53 percent of the shots and expect Lundqvist and Quick to match their average save percentages over the last three years, that leads to a draw at even strength. Other components — special teams, shooting and perhaps fatigue — are all pretty small factors, but also seem to work in the Rangers’ favor.Ignore the pundits — this thing’s closer to a toss-up than a blowout. read more

Development for Ritz Carlton given the go ahead

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, TCI, February 21, 2017 –  The match appears to be over as TCIG has won the most recent bout of an ongoing court fight over whether or not it is legal for the construction of a 12 storey development on Grace Bay to go forward or to be scrapped.  The Appeals court today upheld a ruling that it is legal and gave the Government and the investors the go ahead on the Ritz Carlton development which has sparked outrage in some quarters and excitement in others.Government had been challenged on the legality of the process by which the development approval was granted; the challengers saying it did not follow the letter of the law, and actually fell far short of what is required before a construction of this scope is approved.  There were some legislative changes, supported strongly at Cabinet and in the House of Assembly and that gave Government, at the time the PNP Administration, the green light for work to begin.However, advancements were delayed by legal battles and public push back that the development is the beginning of the end of the exclusive escape that Grace Bay and Providenciales are… today, the Appellate court disagreed and upheld the decision that the Government and the Developers are permitted to move forward on the plan.   The Ritz Carlton development is expected to create a boom in construction.#MagneticMediaNews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Recommended for you Related Items:#magneticmedianews ALERT # 2 ON POTENTIAL TROPICAL CYCLONE NINE ISSUED BY THE BAHAMAS DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY THURSDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER, 2019 AT 9 PM EDT Electricity Cost of Service Study among the big agenda items at September 11 Cabinet meeting The Luxury of Grace Bay in Down Town Provolast_img read more

Selfhealing catalysts make it easier to store solar energy with water

first_img(Phys.org)—Currently one of the most efficient ways to store solar energy is to transfer the energy to catalysts that split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Then the hydrogen can either be used as a fuel or later recombined with oxygen to produce water and release electricity when needed. Explore further However, one of the problems with using water to store solar energy is that the catalysts are made of earth-abundant elements (such as manganese, cobalt, and nickel) that corrode in water with a neutral pH. To address this problem, researchers have designed self-healing catalysts that can regenerate themselves in the presence of other elements, such as negatively charged phosphate or borate ions. One of the remarkable features of the self-healing catalysts is that, as long as they are operating, there is no limit to the number of times that they can heal themselves.Now in a new paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, two of the researchers who have developed the self-healing catalyst, Cyrille Costentin at Paris Diderot University and Daniel G. Nocera at Harvard University, have investigated how this process works at a more detailed level.”This paper provides a quantitative model for self-healing,” Nocera told Phys.org. “It actually extends beyond energy and provides a roadmap for the design of any self-healing catalyst. The rule set is self-assembly and catalysis. If the energy input for operation of the catalyst is greater than that for self-assembly, then the catalyst should be self-healing. So the principles developed in this paper are general.”As the researchers show in their work, a catalyst can self-heal if the self-healing process requires less energy than that needed for normal catalyst operation. A simple way to control the self-healing process is to adjust the pH of the solution, since the amount of energy required for these two processes depends on the pH. The researchers show that there is a critical pH “zone of self-healing” that depends on various factors, in particular the geometry of the water-splitting cell and the phosphate or borate buffer concentration. Fortunately for practical applications, the researchers show that self-healing can occur over a wide range of pH values, including at a neutral pH for typical cell geometries and buffer concentrations, which allows for most natural water sources to be used to store solar energy. Since much of the future demand for renewable energy is expected to come from low-income, developing countries, the ability to use local natural water sources instead of pure water for storing solar energy will offer a big advantage for implementing the technology cost-effectively and on a large scale. The researchers plan to work toward this goal in the future.”The next stage is prototyping,” Nocera said. “We are using this catalyst in conjunction with CO2 and N2 fixing bacteria (papers from our group in Science in 2016 and PNAS in 2017) to make liquid fuels and fertilizer, renewably (using only air, water, and sunlight as inputs). These prototypes are currently being developed in India at this time.” , Science More information: Cyrille Costentin and Daniel G. Nocera. “Self-healing catalysis in water.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1711836114 Scientists produce robust catalyst to split water into hydrogen, oxygen Citation: Self-healing catalysts make it easier to store solar energy with water (2017, September 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-09-self-healing-catalysts-easier-solar-energy.html The self-assembly pathway used for self-healing catalysts. Credit: Costentin et al. ©2017 PNAS © 2017 Phys.org Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more